More than weight problems and diabetes, how about Alzheimer's too?

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
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Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA
Tuesday, October 16, 2012
ROCHESTER, Minn. — People 70 and older who eat food high in carbohydrates have nearly four times the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, and the danger also rises with a diet heavy in sugar, Mayo Clinic researchers have found. Those who consume a lot of protein and fat relative to carbohydrates are less likely to become cognitively impaired, the study found. The findings are published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/news2012-rst/7128.html
 

mommysunshine

New member
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Oct 23, 2010
Location
Sunny, tropical, CA.
Studies can be unreliable. We aren't told what type of carbohydrate they're consuming. A package of instant mashed potatoes is a lot different than a whole potato with the skin.

It's a bit crazy how studies contradict one a another. Eat low fat and low protein for longevity. No! Do not comsume many carbs but eat lots of meat and veggies.

It is interesting to note that isolated societies that have many centurians eat a plant based diet with very little meat and fat. But they also live in unpolluted areas and work hard with their bodies.
 

ChrisCarlton67

New member
Joined
Sep 17, 2012
very true. I've observed random cultures that have longevity and their diets are whole, natural plant based foods.

I think it also comes down to not eating the processed stuff that's so prevalent in today's modern society.
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
Nutritionally, yes. Gycemic load? Gram for gram identical. :)
But they are digested differently. Potatos in their whole form will not create the glycemic rush to the same extent that instant potatos do.
Those grams are spread out over a longer time period creating more moderate elevations in blood sugar and a more moderate response in insulin levels.
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
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Location
Seattle, WA
Original Poster
But they are digested differently. Potatos in their whole form will not create the glycemic rush to the same extent that instant potatos do.
Those grams are spread out over a longer time period creating more moderate elevations in blood sugar and a more moderate response in insulin levels.
Actually, it's just the opposite! Goes to show how many nutritional assumptions we make every day. ;)


Instant mashed potato, average 87 GI


Baked russet potato, average 111 GI


That's approximately double the GI of a Snickers bar. :shock:
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
Instant mashed potatoes contain partially hydrogenated oils to increase the shelf life. I'd select the whole potato.

Arrow is on the right track though. Higher fiber foods do not let the sugars absorb quickly or even not at all. Their glycemic index is deceptive. So have some vegetables with that potato.

Take the banana for example. The glycemic index typically say ripe banana, but the GI changes according to how ripe. The riper, the sweeter. And why do they rate xylitol so low (GI 7)? It is because xylitol acts like a fiber, so the sugar is not absorbed so well. Just passes on through. Fiber is essential for diabetics when regarding the glycemic index.

The glycemic index is a good tool, but like all tools, it depends upon how you use it.
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
Id eat two potatos any day over one snickers bar.
But be sure to eat the skins. This is something that the glycemic index does not address, and that is unfortunate. This is why the GI should be treated as one of a few tools. Why?

Because potatoes, especially the skins, contain chromium. Chromium is a trace mineral that helps to maintain normal carbohydrate and fat motabolism by regulating insulin metabolism. It also helps in nucleic acid metabolism and reducing insulin resistance as chromium is an important component of glucose tolerance factor (GTF). So the true glycemic load cannot be clearly expressed on a glycemic index chart. Chromium is only required in miniscule amounts, and potatoes are not even the best source for this mineral.

The potato skin also contains a larger quantity of zinc than the interior. Zinc is one of the components required for the body to produce stomach acid. Sodium is the other mineral for this process.
 

pinballdoctor

Active member
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Location
Saskatchewan Canada
First, the body knows what to do with potatoes. Processed sugar, such as in a snickers bar, is poison, and the body sees it as such.

Besides valuable nutrients, the potato skin contains fiber, thus increases the breakdown time, reducing sugar spikes.

Comparing potatoes to chocolate bars is like comparing orange juice to antifreeze. I would suggest red potatoes locally grown over the mass produced white, including russet, since these contain GMO's.

The problem isn't with potatoes or complex carbs in general, the problem is with simple carbs, such as high fructose corn syrup and processed sugars, cookies, cakes, crackers, and most baked goods. The countries that consume the most corn syrup also have the most diabetes, obesity, and Alzheimers... and America is at the top of the list.
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA
Original Poster
Diabetics watch their GI for a reason; Sugar is sugar and it is poison in large doses. A GI load of two baked potatoes could be toxic, whereas the Snickers bar would not be.

In Conclusion: Be careful about assumptions, they could be deadly. :yuck:
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA
Original Poster
First, the body knows what to do with potatoes.

Yes it does. Your saliva starts converting the starches into sugar before they even go down your esophagus. Sugar is sugar; Your body must make insulin to deal with excess sugar, no way around it. :roll:
 


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