Are vitamins toxic?

Fit4LifeDoc

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May 26, 2009
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Cedar Park, Texas
Boy, nothing like an over-dramatic Thread Title!

If you look at the ingredients label on your favorite vitamin bottle, 99.9% of the time you will find something called Magnesium Stearate (aka Stearic Acid). According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine's TOXNET website, Magnesium Stearate is considered "slightly toxic by ingestion."

Since most of us do in fact "ingest" our vitamins, this may be something to avoid. ;)

Here is a link to the TOXNET data sheet on Magnesium Stearate: HSDB Search Results - Frameset

After learning this little tidbit a couple of years ago, I was disturbed to find that nearly all of my supplements contained Magnesium Stearate. There are a few vitamin companies that don't use it, but you have to search a little.
 

Fit4LifeDoc

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Original Poster
By the way, HSDB stands for "Hazardous Substance Data Bank"...Nobody is even trying to hide the fact that Magnesium Stearate is "hazardous"...Just food for thought :)
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Boy, nothing like an over-dramatic Thread Title!

If you look at the ingredients label on your favorite vitamin bottle, 99.9% of the time you will find something called Magnesium Stearate (aka Stearic Acid). According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine's TOXNET website, Magnesium Stearate is considered "slightly toxic by ingestion."

Since most of us do in fact "ingest" our vitamins, this may be something to avoid. ;)

Here is a link to the TOXNET data sheet on Magnesium Stearate: HSDB Search Results - Frameset

After learning this little tidbit a couple of years ago, I was disturbed to find that nearly all of my supplements contained Magnesium Stearate. There are a few vitamin companies that don't use it, but you have to search a little.
Just scanned my med chest and my Selenium, Glucosamine, Resveratrol, Calcium Citrate, Magnesium Malate, L-Glutamine and L-Lysine ALL have Magnesium Stearate.

I'm sharing that warm and fuzzy feeling with you! :shock: :twisted: :roll:
 

Fit4LifeDoc

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Kind 2 Creatures,

When I discovered that Mag Stearate was in my "All Natural" supplements that I had purchased from Whole Foods (not cheap mind you), I was ticked off! I know it sounds silly, but I felt a little betrayed. I was feeding that stuff to my two toddlers for heaven's sake!

For the past couple years, during the research phase of writing my book, I uncovered all kinds of disturbing things, like Propylene Glycol for example. This chemical is another one of the free "goodies" that companies put into our food and personal care products.

What does car antifreeze and deodorant have in common? Propylene Glycol!!

This delightful chemical can be found in almost ALL deodorants, shampoos, lotions, etc.... and it is linked to Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD) which is a fancy term form skin rash, welts, reddened or weeping skin, etc..

The worst part is that I was using Tom's of Maine All Natural deodorant (twice the price) for many years before I discovered this! I guess it's better to know things late than never, though...

For your viewing pleasure, here is a link to the U.S. Haz-Map website (Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Agents):

Haz-Map: Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Agents

(For some reason I can't get this to have a link, but if you paste it into your browser it should work).

Anyway, I could go on and on about this kind of thing, but I won't bore you.

Dr. Tom Bynes
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
Propylene Glycol is used as a laxative in hospice work when folks are taking a lot of narcotics for pain. I have never seen a reaction from it and they get 17 grams of it in a dose, sometimes twice a day....none the less, I would not take it, unless I was already on my death bed.

You got to watch out when you shop in Whole Foods, after all, they do sell Canola oil and some claim to be organic. I just feel the canola business has been so shady the truth will never be known to the public. Some canola oil is genetically modified to be resistant to some pests, but most is not, so they say. The riscen was taken out by cross breeding so they say but there are many who think there is a cover up.
 

jw8725

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May 24, 2009
Location
England
you think thats bad? Well look what shows up on the wiki List of IARC Group 3 carcinogens:

 

Ted_Hutchinson

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May 25, 2009
you think thats bad? Well look what shows up on the wiki List of IARC Group 3 carcinogens
This seems to give it a not proven verdict


Similarly if you follow up the link in wiki to the Vitamin K information the carcinogen claim is not in fact supported

I'd bet any money that if there is a difference between synthetic and natural vitamin K as carcinogens that it would be the synthetic form that was most likely to be implicated.

Stephan Whole Health Source on Vitamin K2 I'm now making my own bone marrow stock on the basis of Stephan's blogs.
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
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Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Went to the site of a vitamin company I've been using for years now, and just for the halibut, put Magnesium Stearate in the search box, came back with 757 items!

:banghead:
 

Fit4LifeDoc

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Cedar Park, Texas
Original Poster
I had a hard time finding supplements that don't have magnesium stearate...As far as I can tell, the only place I can find stearic acid-free vitamins is online (no disrespect to Whole Foods ;))
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
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Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
I had a hard time finding supplements that don't have magnesium stearate...As far as I can tell, the only place I can find stearic acid-free vitamins is online (no disrespect to Whole Foods ;))
Fit4LifeDoc,

I can understand how you felt giving supplements with Magnesium Stearate to your children. I don't have kids, but one of my "furkids" started to have seizures in February, and I've been giving her only natural supplements for treatment.


Unfortunately, her Cholodin supplement has MS in it, and for now I'll continue that tablet. I was also giving Taurine and Magnesium Malate to her, both have MS.

Happily, today I found a Magnesium Taurate supplement from Cardiovascular Research Ltd. (no mag stear), at my local Vitamin Cottage. This item is new, and I was glad to see it there. Now me and hubby can take the rest of the Mag Malate and Taurine with the toxic ingredient, to be kind to our furbaby ;)

When we use up the Magnesium Stearate items we have, we'll read labels and make sure we don't buy that junk again, thanks for the important info! :thumbsup:
 

Fit4LifeDoc

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Kind 2 Creatures,

I also have "furkids" and I feel the same way as you do when it comes to giving them healthy food, supplements, etc... after all, they rely on us to take care of them.

It's a shame that we live in such a toxic world, but thanks to sites like this, we have a chance to protect ourselves and family members (furry or not) :D
 

D Bergy

Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2006
Titanium dioxide is another common ingredient in vitamins. The bad part about this is that it strengthens biofilms that bacteria use to protect themselves from the immune system.
Or at least that is what has been claimed.

Dan
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
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Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Today I couldn't find one brand of L-Glutamine capsules at my local vitamin store, without Magnesium Stearate in it. I was able to get the powder form in the Now brand, which lists L-Glutamine free-form as the ONLY ingredient :)

Here's a list of some toxic supplement ingredients:

Most Commonly Used Excipients


Magnesium Stearate
Stearic Acid
Sodium Benzoate
Potassium Sorbate
Flavors or Natural Flavors
Silicon Dioxide
Titanium Dioxide
Colors
Lactose
Cellulose
Gelatin Sodium Glycolate
Talc
Sucrose
Calcium Stearate
Palmitate
Hydroxy Propyl Methylcellulose
Ethylcellulose
Glaze
Shellac
Starch
 

Fit4LifeDoc

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Kind 2 Creatures,

That is an awesome list! I just printed it out to show my patients. There are several ingredients that I didn't know about (the best part is that my wife always calls me a "know-it-all," so now I have proof that I'm not :p)
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Fit4LifeDoc, I'm glad you found the list useful! I really need to print it out and stick it in my wallet!!

I was so proud of myself for finding a (human grade)Magnesium Taurate supplement for my dog with no Magnesium Stearate in it the other day.

Well...I just looked over the label again, and I traded off Mag Stearate for two others, Cellulose and Silicon Dioxide :cry: :evil: Guess if I had the list with me, I would've come home empty handed :roll:

It's hard for an untrained person like myself to understand all the technical information behind all of these toxins, etc. and will be quite the challenge to provide myself, my husband and my pets with good healthy nutritional supplements that won't kill us, LOL ;)
:confused:

I appreciate this forum, all the helpful and knowledgeable members here, and all the good information for me to browse! :thumbsup:

:thanks:
 

Fit4LifeDoc

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I do a ton of research on harmful chemicals, toxins, food additives, etc...and sometimes I just want to move away to some deserted island and grow my own food!:banghead:

But, since I'm stuck here in this toxic land, the only thing I can do to protect myself and my family is to stay current with the latest health news and research.

For example, I recently read a few articles about the powerful weight loss, antioxidant, and anti-cancer benefits of white tea. Here's a link to one article: White Tea May Promote Weight Loss, Reduces Fat Cells

This kind of info helps me sleep at night because at least I know that there are still ways to counter the devastating effects of our toxic, chemically-altered environment.
 

reviyve

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Jun 2, 2009
Location
Westchester County, NY
Hi Everyone-

I am new to the forum and just thought I'd add my 2 cents to the mix if that's ok :)

I think supplements overall are still good for you. The body can not manufacture certain essential minerals and we don't consume enough of them in our daily diets so that's where supplements come into play. I currently take Young Livings Core Supplements which consists of Omega Blue (essential omega fatty acids), Longevity (antioxidants), True Source (vitamins/minerals) and Life 5 (probiotic). The overall health results are great with these products. No magnesium stearate but a little stearic acid in the Omega blue. Unfortunately, sometimes you have to take the good with the bad. For example, the air we breathe is also toxic so what we do? Stop breathing?

http://stressreliefbyrv.com/
 

reviyve

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Westchester County, NY
sounds like a good idea to me jw8725. Unfortunately, we live in an imperfect world. All we can do is the best that we can to eat healthy and consume products as close to nature as possible......too bad that doesn't include cookies
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
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Apr 5, 2009
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USA
Tablets, Capsules, Softgels, Powders, Liquids

After reading this thread I've decided to take my pills minus the outer capsule.
From "AllStar Health"

Tablets are the most cost-effective supplements in general because they are less-expensive to manufacture than other formats. Tablets allow the manufacturer to pack the most material into a given space. From the manufacturing standpoint, tablets are the most shelf-stable choice and retain their potency over a longer time than liquids, powders and most capsules. Tablets can be offered in the widest range of sizes and shapes. And as long as you stick with a name-brand product and take it as directed, you needn’t worry about absorption issues with tablets. Drawbacks to tablets? Large tablets can be hard for some people to swallow. Tablets don’t offer the flexibility of dosing that liquids and powders do.
Caplets are simply tablets that have a smaller size and smoother-coating, making them as easy to swallow as capsules without giving up the other advantages of tablets. There are far fewer products offered in caplet form than tablets, however. In every other respect, caplets are similar to tablets.
Capsules refer to the familiar two-piece gelatin capsules that are widely used in supplements and some medications. Their main advantages are their easy-to-swallow characteristics and their ability to break down quickly in the stomach, although, again, not to the point that there’s any nutritional advantage. Vegetarian capsules, of which VegiCaps are the best-known brand, are a gelatin-free alternative rapidly gaining popularity as customers become more hesitant to consume meat by-products like gelatin. Some people like the fact that they can open up capsules and, using all or part of its powdered contents, mix the nutrients into applesauce or a protein shake, for example. That can be a great aid to children or others who have difficulty swallowing pills. The drawbacks of capsules? They cost considerably more than tablets. They have significant space and potency limitations since their powdered contents cannot be compressed to a significant degree. Since capsules are not air-tight, their shelf-life is shorter than tablets. They are not suited to liquid or oil-based nutrients either unless special, expensive encapsulation techniques and products are used.
Softgels are one-piece gelatin capsules almost exclusively used for liquid or oil-based formulas. Although vegetarian softgels have been introduced to the market, adoption has been slow and as of this writing, gelatin softgels are still virtually the only type you’re likely to come across when supplement shopping. Because of their smooth contour and shape, softgels are very easy-to-swallow regardless of size. They also offer superior shelf-life profiles to capsules, liquids and powders since they are completely sealed and air-tight. But like tablets, you don’t have any flexibility with the dose of softgels since they can’t be neatly broken or opened up. You can use more softgels or fewer softgels, but that’s it. Softgel manufacture is specialized and considerably more expensive than tablets or capsules, and softgel product pricing tends to reflect that.
Chewables need no explanation. But they always cost more on a dollars-per-milligram basis and tend to be lower potency when compared to comparable products in tablet and capsule form. They also usually have some sugar and flavorings added, which many health-conscious people strenuously try to avoid. So chewables are best-reserved for children or those people who really can’t swallow tablets or capsules.
Powders can be very cost-effective on a dollars-per-nutrient basis, but are also the least convenient to use, since they must be mixed into a liquid, shake or a food. Powders do offer great flexibility with dosing - you can make much finer adjustments to the dose than with tablets and capsules. For supplements taken in gram quantities such as creatine, protein and glutamine, powders are much, much more practical. For example, a typical 5-gram serving of creatine is easy to take; a small scoop of tasteless powder mixed in with water or juice. But to get that same dose with capsules, you’d need 10 x 500 mg capsules or 5 x extra-large 1g capsules.
Liquid supplements. Customers often seek out liquid supplements based on their belief that liquid supplements absorb faster and are therefore better than other forms. They might, but, again, this difference is not great enough to amount to a noticeable or significant nutritional difference, so that’s not really a great reason to go liquid. And as we’ve said, when it comes to essential nutrients, slower absorption may be better. Liquids do offer a lot of flexibility with dosing and are very easy for most people to take. Drawbacks? They are always more expensive on a dollars-per-nutrient basis and their shelf life is shorter than with other formats. They are heavier to transport. They’re not portable like capsules and tablets. They often require refrigeration. Depending on the how it’s made, a liquid supplements often have problems with ingredients settling to the bottom between uses. Even when the bottle is shaken before each use, dispersion of ingredients is imprecise and less consistent than with capsule and tablet products.
So as you can see, there is no one perfect format. It really depends on the supplement and the person taking it. But by knowing the pros and cons of each, it’s easy to zero in on which is best.
 

reviyve

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Jun 2, 2009
Location
Westchester County, NY
I currently use a combination of tablets and powder. My son has a thyroid issue going on (He also has cerebral palsy) and that affected his calcium. I started using Young Living's Therapeutic Grade Calcium in powder form and after two weeks his calcium is back to normal. Praise God. Michelle
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
q=Vitamin+K2]Stephan Whole Health Source on Vitamin K2[/URL] I'm now making my own bone marrow stock on the basis of Stephan's blogs.
Would you mind putting the recipe in the recipe category under nutrition? I'd be interested to see.
 

Sonia

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Jun 5, 2009
Location
New York City
I’ve suspected that my years of supplement taking was really not doing much for me so I decided to switch to combo supplements and thought all those added ingredients may be other supplements included (as I never heard of those big ingredient names before). So, for my own sake I began to research those said names that were found in many over the counter supplements and came across most that there were nothing more then harmful and toxic dyes and fillers such as starch and sugars - some used to completely fill a general size capsule as it is easier then fitting the total ingredients into a direct sized capsule.

I set off on a long (and very expensive) search for supplements that were “proven to myself” to be working. This was not an easy process. I realized those supplements were making my health worse then better. The clincher was when I was told I was now a diabetic and the doctor immediately called in a prescription of insulin for me to start taking. I instead went home and re-vamped my supplements as I found many of those words were sugars and or corn that turns into a sugar that in fact heighten my sensitive to becoming a diabetic. That was years ago and after switching to full form pure supplements I now have daily normal sugar levels … and I never did pick up that doctors prescription.

We are fully in charge of our own health - it’s up to us and only us to know we are using the best quality of substances we put into our bodies - medically supervised medicines can be just as dangerous as over the counter supplements.

Education is always key either way.

JW8725 commented “take my pills minus the outer capsule” - that is not always safe as the purpose of a capsule is to move it through your system in a time released matter. There are even some supplements that can burn your internal organs if not capsuled. There are companies that use a more pure form of capsulation.
 
 

pinballdoctor

Active member
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Oct 1, 2007
Location
Saskatchewan Canada
Magnesium Stearate is used to keep the caplet machines lubed, so there are no breakdowns.

The problem is it also lubes the intestines, and if you keep using supplements that contain it, it will coat the intestines to the point that you won't be able to absorb nutrients.

Best to avoid mag stearate.
 


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