Zika fraud

d0ug

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Nov 29, 2013
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Dominican Republic

Firekin4

New member
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Oct 10, 2015
Links won't work on my phone. So is microcephaly the only epidemic, or are it and zika both separate epidemics? If the microcephaly is caused by pesticides, which is equally believable, then what of the talk about zika, which is apparently not even a problem, being connected to the GMO herpes mosquitoes?
 

Firekin4

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Oct 10, 2015
And of course "even the alternative websites" took the bait, zika could be the zombie virus.
 

d0ug

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Joined
Nov 29, 2013
Location
Dominican Republic
Original Poster
Firekin4
The Zika virus is causing just mild flu symptoms and some people have no symptoms. I has been around in other countries for years and no mention of microcephaly. Brazil uses more pesticides than any other country and pesticides are linked to microcephaly. 2+2 still equals 4 but the chemical companies what you to think different.
 

Firekin4

New member
Joined
Oct 10, 2015
Well yeah, if we think the microcephaly is caused by a virus, pregnant women can be scared into vaccines and anivirals. Keep them on the drug cycle, AND get the babies messed up too if they aren't already. Can't propagate vaccines with a pesticide scare. Yet. "Worried about cancer-causing pesticides in your food making you sick and causing birth defects in your children? Gain immunity with our new experimental vaccine containing small amounts of the harmful pesticides plus added mercury and formaldehyde!"
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Some opinion on news vs reality? More here. https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2...-non-evidence/


February 4, 2016

I can now provide the latest update on what researchers in Brazil are discovering, as they dig into their original findings about the Zika virus and cases of microcephaly (babies born with small heads and brain impairment).

A correspondent has offered a translation of an article that appeared in one of the major Sao Paulo newspapers, O Estado de São Paulo, on February 2nd, “País tem 404 casos confirmados de microcefalia”:

It is obvious that no significant connection between microcephaly and the Zika virus has been found. It’s not even close. So far, therefore, there is absolutely no reason to trumpet an epidemic of Zika. Doing so is quite insane, by any reasonable standard.

Here are the principal facts in the article (after which I’ll comment):

* As of January 30, 2015, 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly were reported in Brazil.

* Of those, 3,670 suspected cases of microcephaly, covering the entire country of Brazil, are being investigated.

* Of those 3,670, 404 cases have been confirmed as microcephaly or “other alterations in the central nervous system” of babies.

* Of those 404 cases, 17 “had a relationship with zika virus.”

* 98% of the 404 microcephaly cases come from the Northeast area of Brazil, and in that area, Pernambuco has the highest number of cases: 56.
Now, let’s take each one of these reported facts and examine it.

First: 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly in Brazil. “Suspected” is the operative word. This number means nothing, because it says nothing about confirmation. It’s just a raw figure.
3,670 of these cases are being researched.

Of these 3,670, 404 have been confirmed as microcephaly or other alterations in the central nervous system of the babies. The key word here is “or.” The researchers don’t know how many of the 404 babies have microcephaly. At the very most, it would be 404. 404 cases of microcephaly in the whole country of Brazil, so far. That is not an epidemic.

For example, every year in the US, there are 25,000 cases of microcephaly. And the literature is very clear about causes: any insult to the fetal brain during pregnancy can result in microcephaly. Severe malnutrition, falling down stairs, a blow to the stomach, a toxic street drug or medical drug or vaccine or pesticide, and so on.

Of these 404 cases of (possible) microcephaly in Brazil, 17 babies have been found who “have a relationship with the Zika virus.” It’s hard to be more vague. But for the sake of argument, let’s say that in each of the 17, with a correct test done properly, the Zika virus was isolated. This finding does not even remotely approach proof that Zika is causing microcephaly. It’s miles away from proof. Any honest researcher will tell you that. If Zika were the cause, researchers should have been able to find it in the overwhelming majority of the 404 babies. 17 out of 404 is, in fact, major evidence that Zika is not the cause.

98% of the 404 (possible) microcephaly cases come from the Northeast region of Brazil. Before jumping to any conclusions, realize that standards on reporting such cases differ from region to region. Up until now, there was no national focus on microcephaly. So there may be other cases from other regions.

As for the 56 cases in Pernambuco, understand that the population of this area is 9.27 million people. It is significant to note that commercial agriculture is widespread in Pernambuco, and agriculture means toxic pesticides—an important causal factor in microcephaly, as I’ve detailed in other articles.
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
"Genetically engineered mosquitoes may be released in the Florida Keys in the next month or two. Will they make infectious diseases spread even more quickly? Action Alerts!

As we reported previously, Oxitec, a British biotech company, plans to release an experimental mosquito population genetically engineered to combat dengue fever. This is especially unnecessary since there have been no cases of dengue fever reported in the Florida Keys since 2010. The company has been preparing for FDA approval to use Key West as a test population, which is expected to happen within the first two months of 2015.

They aren’t testing in Florida to see whether they can reduce dengue fever in the populations there currently, but rather to see whether they can eradicate the particular breed of mosquito that carries dengue fever. They would do this by releasing GM mosquitoes to breed with the population that carries dengue fever, resulting in offspring that can no longer have offspring.

Of particular concern is the fact that a recent study showed that the same GM mosquitoes released in Brazil did not, in fact, lead to a drop in dengue fever. The number of mosquito eggs fell by an impressive 92% in the city of Jacobina in eastern Brazil—but it did not lead to a drop in the incidence of dengue itself. In fact, there are concerns in Brazil that GM mosquitoes could make dengue outbreaks worse, since a second more invasive species could move into the ecological niche left by lowered populations of the target species

- See more at: http://healthimpactnews.com/2015/gen....x3JaSMSd.dpuf"


More here: http://theantimedia.org/zika-outbrea...eased-in-2015/


Zika seemingly exploded out of nowhere. Though it was first discovered in 1947, cases only sporadically occurred throughout Africa and southern Asia. In 2007, the first case was reported in the Pacific. In 2013, a smattering of small outbreaks and individual cases were officially documented in Africa and the western Pacific. They also began showing up in the Americas. In May 2015, Brazil reported its first case of Zika virus — and the situation changed dramatically.
Brazil is now considered the epicenter of the Zika outbreak, which coincides with at least 4,000 reports of babies born with microcephaly just since October.
When examining a rapidly expanding potential pandemic, it’s necessary to leave no stone unturned so possible solutions, as well as future prevention, will be as effective as possible. In that vein, there was another significant development in 2015.
Oxitec first unveiled its large-scale, genetically-modified mosquito farm in Brazil in July 2012, with the goal of reducing “the incidence of dengue fever,” as The Disease Daily reported. Dengue fever is spread by the same Aedes mosquitoes which spread the Zika virus — and though they “cannot fly more than 400 meters,” WHO stated, “it may inadvertently be transported by humans from one place to another.”By July 2015, shortly after the GM mosquitoes were first released into the wild in Juazeiro, Brazil, Oxitec proudlyannounced they had “successfully controlled the Aedes aegypti mosquito that spreads dengue fever, chikungunya and zika virus, by reducing the target population by more than 90%.”
Though that might sound like an astounding success — and, arguably, it was — there is an alarming possibility to consider.


Nature, as one Redditor keenly pointed out, finds a way — and the effort to control dengue, zika, and other viruses, may have backfired dramatically.
Juazeiro, Brazil — the location where genetically-modified mosquitoes were first released into the wild.

The particular strain of Oxitec GM mosquitoes, OX513A, are genetically altered so the vast majority of their offspring will die before they mature — though Dr. Ricarda Steinbrecher published concerns in a report in September 2010 that a known survival rate of 3-4 percent warranted further study before the release of the GM insects. Her concerns, which were echoed by several other scientists both at the time and since, appear to have been ignored — though they should not have been.

Those genetically-modified mosquitoes work to control wild, potentially disease-carrying populations in a very specific manner. Only the male modified Aedes mosquitoes are supposed to be released into the wild — as they will mate with their unaltered female counterparts. Once offspring are produced, the modified, scientific facet is supposed to ‘kick in’ and kill that larvae before it reaches breeding age — if tetracycline is not present during its development. But there is a problem.

Aedes aegypti mosquito. Image credit: Muhammad Mahdi Karim


According to an unclassified document from the Trade and Agriculture Directorate Committee for Agriculture dated February 2015, Brazil is the third largest in “global antimicrobial consumption in food animal production” — meaning, Brazil is third in the world for its use of tetracycline in its food animals. As a study by the American Society of Agronomy, et. al., explained, “It is estimated that approximately 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in waste.” One of the antibiotics (or antimicrobials) specifically named in that report for its environmental persistence is tetracycline.

In fact, as a confidential internal Oxitec document divulged in 2012, that survival rate could be as high as 15% — even with low levels of tetracycline present. “Even small amounts of tetracycline can repress” the engineered lethality. Indeed, that 15% survival rate was described by Oxitec:
“After a lot of testing and comparing experimental design, it was found that [researchers] had used a cat food to feed the [OX513A] larvae and this cat food contained chicken. It is known that tetracycline is routinely used to prevent infections in chickens, especially in the cheap, mass produced, chicken used for animal food. The chicken is heat-treated before being used, but this does not remove all the tetracycline. This meant that a small amount of tetracycline was being added from the food to the larvae and repressing the [designed] lethal system.”

Even absent this tetracycline, as Steinbrecher explained, a “sub-population” of genetically-modified Aedes mosquitoes could theoretically develop and thrive, in theory, “capable of surviving and flourishing despite any further” releases of ‘pure’ GM mosquitoes which still have that gene intact. She added, “the effectiveness of the system also depends on the [genetically-designed] late onset of the lethality. If the time of onset is altered due to environmental conditions … then a 3-4% [survival rate] represents a much bigger problem…”

As the WHO stated in its press release, “conditions associated with this year’s El Nino weather pattern are expected to increase mosquito populations greatly in many areas.”

Incidentally, President Obama called for a massive research effort to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus, as one does not currently exist. Brazil has now called in 200,000 soldiers to somehow help combat the virus’ spread. Aedes mosquitoes have reportedly been spotted in the U.K. But perhaps the most ironic — or not —proposition was proffered on January 19, by the MIT Technology Review:

“An outbreak in the Western Hemisphere could give countries including the United States new reasons to try wiping out mosquitoes with genetic engineering.

“Yesterday, the Brazilian city of Piracicaba said it would expand the use of genetically modified mosquitoes …
“The GM mosquitoes were created by Oxitec, a British company recently purchased by Intrexon, a synthetic biology company based in Maryland. The company said it has released bugs in parts of Brazil and the Cayman Islands to battle dengue fever.”
refugee crisis & related issues, 1st Amendment concerns, ending police brutality, and general government & corporate accountability. Born in North Carolina, she now lives in Cincinnati, Ohio.
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greif

New member
Joined
May 26, 2012
Location
wisconsin
I saw on ABC world news tonight ( that's the one with all the pharma adds) that scientists were trying to confirm that it is caused by the zika virus...... Does that mean there is doubt?
 

d0ug

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Joined
Nov 29, 2013
Location
Dominican Republic
Original Poster
Even the WHO side steps the microcephaly was caused by Zika Virus they say it might be, we think it is possible, but not it is.
They will agree that microcephaly is caused by certain farm chemicals and Brazil just increased its use of these chemicals by 100%.
They are always looking for a virus so they can bring out another vaccine and they don’t want to hurt their friends the chemical companies.
 

Ajax

New member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Location
Chicago Area
There are only 7 cases where they actually found the virus. All the other "cases" were births with small cranial size which they leaped to the conclusion -- must be Zika virus.
 


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