Puffed Wheat Danger?

JanH

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Location
California
Interesting and frightening excerpt from Paul A. Stitt’s “Beating the Food Giants”:
“While I was doing research on my project in Quaker’s library, I came across a little flyer that the company had published in 1942. It contained a report on a study in which four sets of rats were given special diets. One group received plain whole-wheat kernels, water, vitamins and minerals. Another group received Puffed Wheat, water, and the same nutrient solution. A third set was given water and white sugar, and a fourth given nothing but water and the chemical nutrients. The rats which received the whole wheat lived more than a year on the diet. The rats who got nothing but water and vitamins lived for about eight weeks, and the animals on a white sugar and water diet lived for a month. But Quaker’s own laboratory study showed that rats given vitamins, water and all the Puffed Wheat they wanted died in two weeks. It wasn’t a matter of the rats dying of malnutrition; results like these suggested that there was something actually toxic about the Puffed Wheat itself. Proteins are very similar to certain toxins in molecular structure, and the puffing process of putting the grain under 1500 pounds-per-square-inch of pressure, and then releasing it, may produce chemical changes which turn a nutritious grain into a poisonous substance. And Quaker has known about this toxicity since 1942.
“I was shocked, so I showed the report to Dr. Clark, who shared my concern. His predecessor, Dr. Graham, had published the report, and begged the company not to continue producing Puffed Wheat because of its poisonous effect on animals. Dr. Clark was so upset about finding a report like this in the company’s own literature that he went right to the president of the company, Robert D. Stuart, III. ‘I know people should throw it on brides and grooms at weddings,’ Stuart cracked, ‘but if they insist on sticking it in their mouths can I help it? Besides, we made $9 million on the stuff last year.’ That’s a direct quote! I could hardly believe my ears when Dr. Clark told me the president’s word, but I was soon informed that the situation was not important, and that I had better keep my nose in my own business and not worry about what was going on in the rest of the company.
“Since the publication of the first edition of this book, the Quaker Oats Company hotly denied that this study existed. I have little doubt that the study no longer exists, but I still maintain that I saw it there with my own eyes. Furthermore, published studies confirm that the process of puffing any grain gives the product a negative nutritional value. I have repeated similar tests with white rats, and have found that rats on a diet of Puffed Wheat do worse than animals eating nothing at all.”
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Hmmm...I've never eaten puffed wheat cereal, and luckily I don't eat much cereal at all. But as a kid I did eat Rice Krispies, which was puffed rice. I imagine a lot of boxed dry cereals, especially those bought in a regular supermarket are in the same category, even corn flakes. Good to know this stuff, especially when feeding our children this junk. :roll:
 

Mad Scientest

New member
Joined
Apr 11, 2006
Location
Illinois
Interesting so the nutritional value of puffed wheat isn’t all that it is puffed up to be. Although when you consider the manufacturing process it kind of makes sense. Thanks for exploding this myth.
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
This is extremely interesting. The extreme high pressures, even for a millisecond would also create extreme high temeratures that could cause all sorts of different chemical changes. No wonder this info was buried from the mainstream media.
 

Mad Scientest

New member
Joined
Apr 11, 2006
Location
Illinois
Popcorn is probably OK.
It is the water in the corn that is turned to steam which causes the kernel to burst and boiling water cannot exceed 212 degrees. So it’s probably safe.
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Popcorn is probably OK.
It is the water in the corn that is turned to steam which causes the kernel to burst and boiling water cannot exceed 212 degrees. So it’s probably safe.
The water is encapsulated so it does get higher than 212, but if you look at a water vapor pressure, temperature curve, it probably does not exceed 400 degrees, vs the thousand degree millisecond it sees in puffing.
 

u&iraok

New member
Joined
May 22, 2009
Location
In my head
I used to eat puffed wheat cereal and always felt crappy afterward.
 


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