Olive Leaf Extract May Combat Hypertension

Harry Hirsute

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Propecia, CA
ScienceDaily (Aug. 28, 2008) — Taking 1000mg of a specific olive leaf extract (EFLA®943) can lower cholesterol and lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension (high blood pressure). These findings came from a 'Twins' trial, in which different treatments were given to identical twins.

By doing this, researchers could increase the power of their data by eliminating some of the uncertainties caused by genetic variations between individual people.

Hypertension is one of the most common and important disease risk factors imposed by the modern lifestyle. Many people would therefore benefit from finding ways of reducing blood pressure. Experiments in rats had previously indicated that olive leaf extract could be one way of achieving this goal.

To test this in humans, researchers from Switzerland and Germany conducted a pilot trial with 20 identical (monozygotic) twin pairs who had an increased blood pressure. Individuals were either given placebo capsules or capsules containing doses of 500mg or 1000mg of olive leaf extract EFLA®943.

Pairs of twins were assigned to different treatments. After the subjects had taken the extract for eight weeks researchers measured blood pressures as well as collecting data about aspects of life-style.

"The study confirmed that olive leaf extract EFLA®943 has antihypertensive properties in humans," says one of the co-authors, Cem Aydogan, General Manager, Frutarom Health.

"This works showed that taking a 1000mg dose has substantial effects in people with borderline hypertension," says Aydogan.

The research is published in the latest edition of Phytotherapy Research.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080827002717.htm
 

pinballdoctor

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Saskatchewan Canada
curious as to why it must be this specific olive leaf extract, and not an ordinary olive leaf extract.
Here is something else to think about..
Hypertention may be caused (in part) by yeast or fungi, and olive leaf extract is a good natural antifungal... interesting..
 

Harry Hirsute

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the reasons

curious as to why it must be this specific olive leaf extract, and not an ordinary olive leaf extract.
It needn't be this specific extract. But, it's also fair to say that not all olive leaf extracts will provoke such a response.

In this study, they specifically wanted to see what effects this standardized extract would have.

There's been other research that showed similar effects but with other olive leaf extracts - that may have been standardized for different active ingredients, or differing levels of active ingredients, or that were given in different dosages.

Scientifically testing natural extracts is often more complicated than testing synthetic chemicals. Many more variables are typically involved.
 

liverock

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Olive leaf has also been found to lower blood sugar in animals.
Looks like it could be an useful nutrient for Metabolic Syndrome patients who need to lower both blood pressure and blood sugar.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16236331?dopt=Abstract
Life Sci. 2006 Feb 16;78(12):1371-7. Epub 2005 Oct 19.

[SIZE=+1]Hypoglycemic and antioxidant effect of oleuropein in alloxan-diabetic rabbits.[/SIZE]

Al-Azzawie HF, Alhamdani MS.

Biochemistry Department, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq.

Patients with diabetes mellitus are likely to develop certain complication such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy as a result of oxidative stress and overwhelming free radicals. Treatment of diabetic patients with antioxidant may be of advantage in attenuating these complications. Oleuropein, the active constituent of olive leaf (Olea europaea), has been endowed with many beneficial and health promoting properties mostly linked to its antioxidant activity. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of supplementation of oleuropein in reducing oxidative stress and hyperglycemia in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits. After induction of diabetes, a significant rise in plasma and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) and blood glucose as well as alteration in enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants was observed in all diabetic animals. During 16 weeks of treatment of diabetic rabbits with 20 mg/kg body weight of oleuropein the levels of MDA along with blood glucose and most of the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were significantly restored to establish values that were not different from normal control rabbits. Untreated diabetic rabbits on the other hand demonstrated persistent alterations in the oxidative stress marker MDA, blood glucose and the antioxidant parameters. These results demonstrate that oleuropein may be of advantage in inhibiting hyperglycemia and oxidative stress induced by diabetes and suggest that administration of oleuropein may be helpful in the prevention of diabetic complications associated with oxidative stress.

PMID: 16236331 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 

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