Controlling Blood Pressure Naturally

Arrowwind09

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Oct 16, 2007
I have a friend who has pretty severe high blood pressure that started with a vaccine that she received in the military about 30 years ago. Many of the people who got this vaccine got pretty sick and ended up in the infirmary. She toughed it out and never reported ill. It caused fever and weakness and she thinks she had a kidney infection but it was so long ago she is not sure, and she was so young. Since that time she has had sky high Blood Pressures causing her to need two pretty strong medications.

Since mms she has been able to drop one med but it is variable and sometimes she still needs it but she says she is now getting days with normal readings but it is not steady and predictable.

So this high BP was sudden onset following vaccination and kidney infection. There is no signs of vascular disease. Cholesterol is a little high but ratios are perfect. I think her vascular system is OK.... but we should get a homocystine level checked.

So I am looking for alternative treatments for BP that has its origin in kidney issues and probably adrenal issues. The typical rotor rooter for the vascular system I doubt will help her as that is not the issue.

Any ideas?......thanks.
 

Last edited:

liverock

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I dont know of anything that will specifically help kidneys damaged by vaccination, but there are some supplements that seem to help patients who have undergone chemo and they helped prevent or heal damaged kidneys. Gingko and Taurine also seem to reduce blood pressure as well.

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-065c.shtml

Curcumin.

A potent antioxidant extract from the spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), curcumin has a wide range of health benefits: antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cholesterol-lowering. An interesting study in rats investigated the effect of curcumin on nephrosis caused by adriamycin. Adriamycin is a drug commonly used in chemotherapy (Venkatesan et al. 2000). The results indicated that curcumin "remarkably" prevented kidney injury caused by adriamycin. Venkatesan et al. (2000) stated that their data demonstrated that curcumin offered protection "by suppressing oxidative stress and increasing kidney glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity."[/B] They suggest that administration of curcumin offers promise in the treatment of nephrosis that is caused by adriamycin.
Another group (Suresh Babu et al. 1998) studied the effect of curcumin on streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Streptozotocin is also a commonly used chemotherapy drug. According to Suresh et al. (1998), their data "suggested that dietary curcumin brought about significant beneficial modulation of the progression of renal lesion in diabetes." This benefit of dietary curcumin on diabetic nephropathy may be mediated by its ability to lower blood cholesterol levels.

Ginkgo Biloba.

Already known for its antioxidant effects, ginkgo biloba may also protect small blood vessels against loss of tone, prevent capillary fragility, inhibit atherosclerosis, and treat diabetic vascular disease. Naidu et al. (2000) studied gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Gentamicin is an antibiotic used to treat serious infections. Unfortunately, it has the undesirable side effects of causing kidney damage and irreversible hearing loss. Naidu et al. (2000) found that gentamicin treatment increased levels of blood urea and serum creatinine. However, they also found that ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) protected the rats from gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity by preventing changes in blood urea, serum creatine, and creatine clearance.

Also in a study in rats, Umegaki et al. (2000) examined the effects of GBE extract on the development of hypertension, platelet activation, and renal dysfunction in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats. After 20 days, the rats fed a 2% GBE diet had attenuated development of hypertension.

In another interesting study in rats by Fukaya et al. (1999), encouraging results of co-administration of cisplatin and GBE were reported. Cisplatin is an effective antineoplastic agent (cancer killing) used for treating solid tumors. However, cisplatin also has the undesirable side effects of causing hearing loss and nephrotoxicity. Fukaya et al. (1999) concluded that co-administration of cisplatin with GBE was beneficial to ameliorate cisplatin-induced toxicity without attenuating the antitumor activity of cisplatin.

Grape Seed Extract.

Known for its powerful antioxidant qualities, grape seed extract also acts as a smooth muscle relaxant in blood vessels to combat hypertension. Ray et al. (2000) studied the protective effects of grape seed extract against biological, pharmacological, and toxicological effects of certain drugs to the kidneys, lungs, and heart in mice (acetaminophen, amiodarone, and doxorubicin). Ray et al. (2000) found that "grape seed extract preexposure prior to acetaminophen, amiodarone, and doxorubicin provided near complete protection in terms of serum chemistry changes and significantly reduced DNA fragmentation." Moderate to massive tissue damage occurred by all three drugs in the absence of grape seed extract. Bagchi et al. (2000) also found that grape seed extract "demonstrated excellent protection against acetaminophen overdose-induced liver and kidney damage."

Green Tea.

Yokozawa et al. (1999) studied the effects of green tea tannin to ameliorate cisplatin-induced renal injury in rats. They found that green tea tannin suppressed the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, "the suppressive effect increasing with the dose of green tea tannin." Additional testing showed rats given green tea tannin had decreased blood levels of urea nitrogen and creatinine and decreased urinary levels of protein and glucose, indicating less kidney damage. Yokozawa et al. (1999) concluded that "based on the evidence available, it appeared that green tea tannin eliminated oxidative stress and was beneficial to renal function." Earlier, researchers (Wardle 1999; Yokozawa et al. 1996) reported that green tea tannin was found to be beneficial for the kidney under oxidative stress. In 1991, Mukoyama et al. found that green tea had antiviral activity, inhibiting rotaviruses and enteroviruses in rhesus monkeys.

Soy.

There is evidence that dietary phytoestrogens have a beneficial role in chronic renal disease (Velasquez et al. 2001; Ranich et al. 2001). Nutritional intervention studies demonstrated that consuming soy-based protein and flaxseed reduced proteinuria and attenuated renal functional or structural damage in both animals and humans. To date the studies have been of relatively short durations and involved small numbers of subjects. However, the results are encouraging and further investigations are needed. Three groups of researchers (Tomobe et al. 1998; Aukema et al. 1999; Ogborn et al. 2000) investigated the effects of a soy protein diet on polycystic kidney disease. Although the studies were conducted in rats and mice, the research teams suggested that dietary soy protein-based diets had beneficial effects in polycystic kidney disease: soy diet prevented significant elevation in serum creatinine in diseased vs. normal animals (Ogborn et al. 2000); soy protein is effective in retarding cyst development and this beneficial effect may be unrelated to genistein (an isoflavonoid present in soy protein) content (Tomobe et al. 1998); dietary protein level and source significantly affect polycystic kidney disease, with the effects being most pronounced in female animals fed low protein diets and soy protein-based diets (Aukema et al. 1999).

Taurine.

Taurine is abundant in the brain, heart, gallbladder, and kidneys and plays an important role in health and disease in these organs. Taurine is an amino acid that has been shown to protect against experimentally induced lipid peroxidation of the renal glomerular and tubular cells and may alleviate tubular disorders such as glomerular impairment (Trachtman et al. 1996). It is also thought to lower blood pressure by balancing the ratio of sodium to potassium in the blood. Taurine may also regulate the increased nervous system activity that can contribute to high blood pressure. According to Franconi et al. (1995), some people with Type I diabetes appear to be deficient in the amino acid taurine.

Trimethylglycine (Betaine).

Trimethylglycine (TMG) plays a role in the manufacture of carnitine and serves to protect the kidneys from damage (Chambers 1995). TMG has been reported to play a role in reducing blood levels of homocysteine, a toxic breakdown product of amino acid metabolism that is believed to promote atherosclerosis. The main nutrients involved in controlling homocysteine levels are folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12, but TMG has been reported to be helpful in some individuals whose elevated homocysteine levels did not improve with these other nutrients. TMG has also shown to be helpful in certain rare genetic disorders involving cysteine metabolism (Wilken et al. 1983; Wendel et al. 1984; Gahl et al. 1988; Barak et al. 1996; Selhub 1999; van Guldener et al. 1999). Its primary use as a nutritional supplement is in supporting proper liver function and possibly reducing the risk of urinary tract infections
 

EarlyBird

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Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
Arrow, is she getting sufficient magnesium on a daily basis?
I don't know about the kidney issues, but I do think 2000 mg
or more of magnesium daily might help w/the BP issue.

I do wish her well and hope you can help her find a solution.
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
Here is something delicious to use. I get hibiscus flower powder from mountainroseherbs. Tart; so add stevia or some favored sweetener.

By Charlene Laino
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Nov. 10, 2008 (New Orleans) -- If you're worried about your blood pressure, you may want to follow the British custom of regularly "sipping a cuppa" -- tea, that is.
In a new study, drinking three cups of herbal tea containing hibiscus each day lowered blood pressure.
"Most of the commercial herbal tea blends in the United States contain hibiscus," says Diane L. McKay, PhD, of Tufts University in Boston. She tells WebMD that people with the highest blood pressure at the start of the six-week study benefited the most.
McKay presented the study of 65 healthy men and women with modestly elevated blood pressure at the American Heart Association (AHA) meeting here.
Overall, drinking hibiscus tea blends lowered systolic blood pressure -- the top number in the blood pressure reading -- by an average of 7 points. That was significantly more than the 1-point drop observed in people who were given a placebo in the form of hibiscus-flavored water, McKay says.
While a 7-point drop in blood pressure might not seem like much, she says studies have shown that "even small changes in blood pressure ... when maintained over time ... will reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack."
Past AHA president Robert H. Eckel, MD, says that more study is needed to determine whether herbal tea's blood-pressure-lowering effect can actually be sustained over the long haul.
The degree of blood pressure lowering associated with tea drinking in the study was as much as would be expected with standard blood pressure drugs, he says.

Legumes Help Lower Cholesterol Levels

Other research presented at the meeting suggested that eating a diet rich in pinto beans, chickpeas, and other legumes may help to lower cholesterol levels.
"Based on our findings, [I'd suggest you] consume at least three cups of dry beans and peas, or legumes, a week," says researcher Lydia A. Bazzano, MD, of Tulane University in New Orleans.
Past research has shown that eating soy-rich products may help to control cholesterol levels, but little was known about the non-soy legumes that are more popular in the U.S., she says.
To fill in the knowledge gap, Bazzano and colleagues pooled and analyzed results of 12 studies involving nearly 300 men and women.
Most of them had "undesirable cholesterol levels," she says. Their average total cholesterol level was 250 points at the start of the study; their average LDL, or bad, cholesterol was 172 points.
Total cholesterol in those who ate a legume-rich diet for at least three weeks dropped by an average of 14 points compared to those on placebo. LDL cholesterol dropped by an average of 11 points more in the group eating lots of beans.
High-Fat Diets May Raise Heart Failure Rick

Other research showed that high-fat diets rich in processed meats and cheeses may affect measures of heart failure.
Failing to eat enough vegetables, soy, and fish can have the same effect, says Longjian Liu, MD, of Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia.
Consuming a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, on the other hand, was associated with improved blood vessel function, other research showed.
Eckel shares these tips for a heart-healthy diet:

  • Eat fresh, frozen, and canned vegetables and fruits without high-calorie sauces and added salt and sugars.
  • Increase fiber intake by eating beans, whole-grain products, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Use liquid vegetable oils in place of solid fats.
  • Limit beverages and foods high in added sugars. Common forms of added sugars are sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, dextrose, corn syrups, concentrated fruit juice, and honey.
  • Choose foods made with whole grains. Common forms of whole grains are whole wheat, oats/oatmeal, rye, barley, corn, popcorn, brown rice, wild rice, buckwheat, triticale, bulgur (cracked wheat), millet, quinoa, and sorghum.
  • Cut back on pastries and high-calorie bakery products such as muffins and doughnuts.
  • Select milk and dairy products that are either fat free or low-fat.
  • Incorporate vegetable-based meat substitutes into favorite recipes.
  • Encourage the consumption of whole vegetables and fruits in place of juices.
 

just me

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We used sesame oil on my dad in law... I dont know exactly how it worked, but it worked.. I had saw a sign up at the local health food store that said it would lower high blood pressure, so i tried it... And we experimented with it some. I took his blood pressure one morning, and then asked him to swallow two tablespoons of the oil.. Ddint give him anything to eat or drink other then his water for twenty minutes/half hour, and then retook his blood pressure.... We had a significant drop in numbers, the higher number drop fifty points... So I gave him at first two tablespoons twice a day, and then gradually we went to one table spoon three times a day. It made a big difference... I was able to keep him off the medicine until he went into the nursing home, and then they slammed him right back on the meds without even checking his blood pressure
 

Arrowwind09

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Oct 16, 2007
Original Poster
Thanks guys. The Taurine looks promising and I was already planning the TMG introduction as it comes in powder form and she has a very hard time with pills. I think I will throw in pycogenol and the sesame oil. I know she won't drink tea consistantly so that is out but I will tell her about it anyway. The beans, she could do that, well that for cholesterol but she could use that too. It just a little high, although in good ratios.


Look Just me! http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/news/20030428/sesame-oil-benefits-blood-pressure

I think this is a good idea. She always uses high quality olive oil but it obviously doesn't do anything for her in the blood pressure areana. I think is is good to use several different kinds of oils, not just the same thing over and over so I will tell her about this.


Its taken months just to get her digestion in order and we are almost there. I do think magnesium may be helpful but she hates pills and they nearly make her vomit and mag pills are honkers so I had to research mag oil more and that is now done... so that and epsom salt baths come next too.

It was pretty clear that the mms brought the BP down some. I just wish I could understand exactly why. Since mms her cholesterol is down and in good ratio, her liver enzymes are hugely improved, and her tiglycerides were nearly off the chart and now they only a few points above normal. Insomnia is gone. Digestion improved from mms and further improved with digestive enzymes.... She started D3 as her level was 11!
When the doctor called her when the labs were done her big concern was that her b12 was in the low range of normal and wanted her started on B12 injections ASAP. Didn't mention a word about the vitamin d level. Oversight? or idiocy, who can say. Either way we are getting that straightened out.

Both she and I have had some pretty terrible reactions to B12 injections and we are trying to figure that one out. I take methycycobalamine and she takes the cycobalamine. I've given this injection so many times to zillions of people over the years and no reported problems... now here, both of us sick as dogs from it. It has been properly stored.... any clues on that one? This stuff really helped me with my back pain last year, and I admit it did make me feel strange at the time.... and I figured it was just some kind of B vitamin rush. But recently it put me flat in bed for half a day. It gave her heart palpitaitons... Can't find any writings on these side effects what so ever.
We are starting to wonder if something changed in the manufacturing of the product. My doc, who is into alternative med, said she has not encountered it before. Her doc is such an idiot we didn't even bother to ask her.
 

georgealex

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Apr 22, 2010
Location
Sofia, Bulgaria
Hi Arrowwind, I have a friend who had a similar problem and used a special regimen that brought his BP to normal. Took some time though...
If you are interested, contact me to talk about it.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
There is an inverse relationship between 25(OH)D status and BP Ideally the natural primitive 25(OH)D our DNA evolved with was between 60~80ng/ml and it will take around 1000iu/daily per 25lbs weight to achieve that level.

Worth getting tested after 3months to be sure this is sufficient.

Daily Nighttime Melatonin Reduces Blood Pressure in Male Patients With Essential Hypertension

Omega 3 also reduces BP. The dose of omega-3 fatty acids required to achieve a blood pressure reduction is likely to be at least 3-4 g/day.

Don't forget that exercise is a good way to reduce BP.
 

Arrowwind09

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Original Poster
I'm on to the vitamin D thing. Her level was 11. :shock:
Supplementing. Recheck in a few weeks
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
JFH mentioned it first, but hibiscus tea works. Supposedly, if you eat 4 cloves a day of raw garlic you will not have any high blood pressure issues (or any sex). Celery is suppose to work quite well (3 stalks a day, so juicing celery might be a better option)
 

just me

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What is the normal ranges of blood pressure suppose to be... I got a check up today, and my blood pressure was 140 over 90... I thought that was fairly good??? She is saying its slightly high, but wont prescribe anything until she gets a few more high readings
 

kind2creatures

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Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
What is the normal ranges of blood pressure suppose to be... I got a check up today, and my blood pressure was 140 over 90... I thought that was fairly good??? She is saying its slightly high, but wont prescribe anything until she gets a few more high readings
Hi Justme, the normal is supposed to be below 120/80. Pre-hypertension is 120-139/80-89. High BP is 140-159/90-99. Anything over that is serious. Mine checks out high sometimes and low other times. I like to check myself in the self-serve machines at the drug or grocery stores. I know there may be more error in those machines, but I take that into consideration. It's good she's not prescribing anything, I'd want to try natural remedies first.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
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May 25, 2009
Mine checks out high sometimes and low other times. I like to check myself in the self-serve machines at the drug or grocery stores.
Ideally a home BP monitor is better as you can do it when you are relaxed and can monitor your progress over a period to see how it works out. I think regular home monitoring is probably more accurate than done in a hospital or doctors surgery because your inevitable under some kind of stress when tested by your medic and most are too busy to allow you to be seated for a sufficient time for your level to stabilize. If you are sat on the sofa relaxing at home you can take a reading every half hour and average the numbers or at possibly discount the exceptions.

The arm cuff monitors are pretty cheap in the UK and the results I get are in line (but generally a bit lower) than when tested in the surgery.
 

EarlyBird

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Apr 10, 2006
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Northern Ky.
BP

120/80 or less is considered normal I think.
I bought an inexpensive wrist BP monitor which seems pretty accurate.
I check my BP about every third day. Usually 119/78.
I eat fresh garlic daily - from 2 to 5 segments depending on their size. :D
 

Arrowwind09

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Oct 16, 2007
Original Poster
I agree, Just me, you are running on the high side but not critical. You would do well to get your own BP cuff and keep an eye on it. You can probably bring it down easily enough. Seasme Oil? Right!:)

I usually run about 100 over 60. I've been too low all my life and have a tendency to get faint easily so I have to be very careful about my hydration
 

just me

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I am picking up sesame oil today.... I went to get the checkup because of my weight, and because i woke up from a weird dream the other night.. .I heard this voice yelling at me saying wake up you are having a heart attack if you dont wake up, you will die... So i woke up... very short of breath and heart pounding like a bad dog.. got up, got a drink of water, and just sort of walked around until i could catch my breath... and then did alot of praying to God, letting Him know, that as much as I wanted to be with Him, I wasnt ready to go home yet!!! anyhow... doctor called this morning.. my thyroid levels are way high.... i am allergic to the levothyroxin...so they are prescribing armour... thats the right stuff. right... that is actually what I want, isnt it...
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
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Aug 8, 2009
What type of sesame oil??? The chinese roasted? Could you just use tahini?
 

jfh

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Location
Texas, USA
Celery is suppose to work quite well (3 stalks a day, so juicing celery might be a better option)
This reminds me of an old article that I read (which means the article can't be found, and my mind has cobwebs). The article was about a study with Chinese women and blood pressure. They were eating a lot of celery. I thought the article said something about a special form of sodium in the celery. I found this more current info from LiveStrong. What a great health resource they are.

Using celery juice to alleviate high blood pressure is a Chinese folk remedy that has not been proven in humans through laboratory trials. According to High Blood Pressure Info, celery contains the compound phthalide, which helped lower blood pressure in trials involving laboratory animals. However, the website cautions against humans overindulging in celery as a sole blood pressure remedy until further trials and experiments determine celery's effectiveness in reducing blood pressure in humans.

The Active Compound

Celery juice contains the compound 3-n-butylphtalide, or phthalide, which contributes to the vegetable's taste and aroma. As a chemical affecting the body, phthalide helps relax the smooth muscles in the walls of the blood vessels, according to High Blood Pressure Info. Blood pressure decreases as the blood vessels dilate and allow blood to flow easier and more freely.

Reducing Stress Hormones

Phthalide also helps decrease the production of catecholamines, according to research by clinical pharmacologist William J. Elliot and medical student Quang T. Le, documented at High Blood Pressure Info. Catecholamines are the fight-or-flight hormones that the adrenal glands produce in events of stress. They can contribute to high blood pressure.

Damage From Stress

Stress hormones such as catecholamines can tighten blood vessels and restrict the free flow of blood, increasing the amount of pressure necessary for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. Phthalide blocks the action of tyrosine hydroxylase enzymes that produce stress hormones and contribute to high blood pressure, according to High Blood Pressure Info.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/120254-celery-juice-high-blood-pressure/
 

pinballdoctor

Active member
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Location
Saskatchewan Canada
Wow.

Taking all these supplements may help lower blood pressure, however, with the exception of celery juice, do not address the cause.

High blood pressure is a simple deficiency disease, and can only be reversed by taking the proper nutrients in optimal amounts. For high blood pressure, that means taking magnesium, calcium, potassium, and vitamin D. That is why juicing dark green veggies, such as celery, will "regulate" blood pressure.

Vitamins and minerals, along with phytonutrients and antioxidants, work together to repair and protect the body from disease, however, without these raw materials the body is doomed since you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

On a final note, I just read a study on aspirin and how it helps prevent liver cancer. First, I wondered who paid for this study, and second, how many ignorant people are going to start taking their "cancer preventing " aspirin daily.. and how many of these people will add to the 5000 or more Americans who already die from the side effects of aspirin, and that does not even take into consideration the fact that aspirin robs the body of vitamin C as well as some B vitamins, including folic acid, which increases homocysteine, which ironically causes stroke and heart attack..
 

Arrowwind09

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Oct 16, 2007
Original Poster
I think some of these supplements likely help the minerals you discuss, pbd, to be metabolized correctly and placed... especially garlic, that I know of.

True you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear but neither can you make a silk purse out of mere rocks.
 


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