Black Rice the new super food

jbo

New member
Joined
Nov 20, 2010
Anybody make black rice? I was at a thai resturant that offered brown rice, which I've gotten before, yet it comes out purple so I asked her how they get the brown rice purple and she told me it's actually black rice.

I actually never heard of black rice before and grew up on rice. After reading a little online it seems that people think black rice is super food with more antixidants than blueberries.

We've been eating brown rice at home and we like it especially when mixed with certain juices/brooth, but I'm wondering about black rice. The resturant appeared to mix brown and black together, so I'm wondering if that is how most people make it?

It's also called the forbidden rice as I guess only allowed to be consumed by the Chinese Emperor.

We're thinking about using blackrice instead of brown or maybe mixing it together.
 

Thrasymachus

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Nov 3, 2010
Location
Dover, NJ
@Earlybird, I think they are talking about Japonica Black rice, which actually looks a bit purple-ish in hue as jbo mentioned already.

An American company called Lundberg sells and markets black rice:
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/Lundberg_Black_Japonica™.aspx
In the Northeastern USA some points of sales are: A&P, Shop-rite. Where I live they charge about $3.6x-3.7x for a 18 oz. bag, but Lundberg rice has great quality and taste. I make it regularly it is a great food.

Does anyone know any other company that sells black rice(preferably one with physical points of sale in my area)?
 

jbo

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Joined
Nov 20, 2010
Original Poster
The thai lady told me she buys her black rice at the asian market.

@ Thrasymachus
That's a blend, which seems like what most people use with blackrice.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_rice

What I ate seemed like a blend of brown rice and this black rice, which turns purple after you cook it from what I've read online, because the dish was mostly purple.

These pictures I found make it look as dark as coffee beans

 

Thrasymachus

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Nov 3, 2010
Location
Dover, NJ
Actually it is a blend, I am looking at a package: "medium grain black and short grain mahogany rice." Damn, I need to try to find a pure black rice source to try.
 

EarlyBird

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Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
Supposedly Meijer grocery sells Lundberg rice products. If you have one in your area. Looking at Lundbergs
site, who would buy a 25 lb bag of Jasmine black rice unless one owns a restaurant? :roll:
 

u&iraok

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May 22, 2009
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In my head
I've had it. I got it at Whole Foods. The one I had was made by Lotus Foods and is called Forbidden Rice, because it was once only eaten by emperors in China. It's good--chewy, nutty tasting.

I also like the other rice made by Lotus Foods--Bhutan Red Rice and Jade Pearl Rice. The Jade Pearl is made with bamboo extract and has a really lovely delicate taste.

You can order all of them from Tropical Traditions, also.

Best of all, they're organic.

Oh wow, I just went to Lotus Foods' website and found a bunch of other interesting rices--Brown Mekong Flower, Volcano Rice (grown on volcanic soil and packed with minerals and antioxidants), Madagascar Pink Rice, etc. How fun! I love rice!
 

jbo

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Nov 20, 2010
Original Poster
@ u&iraok
When you made the black rice did you mix it with something else like brown rice or just ate it by itself.

brown rice is everywhere, but black rice appears to be only in an asian area where I live or online. Whole foods is farther from me than the asian area.
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
@ u&iraok
When you made the black rice did you mix it with something else like brown rice or just ate it by itself.

brown rice is everywhere, but black rice appears to be only in an asian area where I live or online. Whole foods is farther from me than the asian area.
jbo, do you order from iherb, they have it and their shipping is extremely cheap
 

u&iraok

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May 22, 2009
Location
In my head
@ u&iraok
When you made the black rice did you mix it with something else like brown rice or just ate it by itself.

brown rice is everywhere, but black rice appears to be only in an asian area where I live or online. Whole foods is farther from me than the asian area.
I just made it by itself. It has a tougher texture than brown rice which makes it chewy, but I liked it. I bet a mix of rices would be good but you would just have to make sure the cooking times are the same and I can't remember if one takes longer than the other.
 

u&iraok

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May 22, 2009
Location
In my head
Black foods: Classy and extra nutritious


United Press International
12-23-11

Chefs prepare food that is black in color because the shade is chic and a bit dramatic, but the dishes are also a boost to health, a U.S. food expert says.
Phil Lempert, a food industry analyst, trend watcher and creator of the Web site supermarketguru.com, said the dark color is the result of naturally occurring flavonoid pigments called anthocyanins -- which protect the plant against oxidation, pests and from damaging radiation from the sun.
In the body, anthocyanins act as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, protecting against the development of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, as well as contributing to overall good health.
For example, black rice, which contains higher amounts of vitamin E in the bran, is great for the immune system and contains more anthocyanin antioxidants than blueberries, the Agricultural Center at Louisiana State University found.
One cup of black lentils contain 8 milligrams of iron, about half the daily recommendation for women, while
black beans are packed with bioflavonoids, powerful plant nutrients that may protect against cancer, Lempert said.
Blackberries, a great source of fiber, are a great choice as an ingredient or as dessert. They contain polyphenols that may help reduce cognitive decline, the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging found.
To wash it down, choose black tea, which contains theaflavins, antioxidants Rutgers University suggested may improve recovery from muscle soreness after intense exercise, Lempert said.
 


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