Acupuncture - testing the meridians

scorpiotiger

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I thought this study was very interesting in that it tested insertion of needles at points defined in acupuncture versus just pressure at those points vs sham accupunture at points other than those defined in TCM

Acupuncture relieves cancer chemotherapy fatigue


* 14:59 20 December 2007
* NewScientist.com news service
* Danny Penman

Acupuncture could help relieve the crippling fatigue associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients. That is the conclusion of scientists at the University of Manchester, UK, who say their preliminary results are so promising that further research needs to be carried out to study the effect in more detail.

Crippling and long-lasting fatigue is one the most common side-effects of chemotherapy. The new work indicates that acupuncture can boost energy levels and radically improve a patient’s quality of life.

Numerous trials have shown that acupuncture appears to work for a variety of conditions. Last year, two studies demonstrated that acupuncture may help boost fertility after IVF, although a third study failed to demonstrate an effect. The US National Institutes of Health says that acupuncture is an effective treatment for nausea caused by anaesthesia and cancer chemotherapy, as well as dental pain following surgery.

In the latest study, 47 patients suffering from moderate to severe fatigue were enrolled in a randomised placebo-controlled trial at Manchester’s Christie Hospital. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups to receive either
  • acupuncture or
  • acupressure – placing physical pressure on acupuncture points with hands or objects – or
  • sham acupressure.
Quality of life

“People felt better and had more energy after the acupuncture,” says Alexander Molassiotis, professor of cancer and supportive care at the University of Manchester who led the work.

“Patients had the energy to walk to the shops and to socialise, so their quality of life improved significantly,” he says.

The acupuncture group received six 20-minute sessions spread over three weeks. During these sessions the characteristic thin needles were inserted about 2 centimetres into the patients’ body at three points. The points were selected for their supposed propensity to boost energy levels and reduce fatigue.

Patients in the acupressure group were taught to massage the same acupuncture points for one minute a day for two weeks.

The sham acupressure group was taught the same technique, but told to massage different points on the body not associated with energy and fatigue.

Patients in the acupuncture group reported a 36% improvement in fatigue levels, whilst those in the acupressure group improved by 19%. Those in the sham acupressure group reported a 0.6% improvement.


Needle mystery


Molassiotis says that the improvements were not down to the placebo effect. “Our trial was able to take this into account,” he says. But he says a bigger trial is needed to properly characterise the effect and is planning one in the near future.

Nobody is sure how acupuncture actually works, but researchers have previously suggested that it might reduce fatigue by stimulating the body to release endorphins – morphine-like chemicals that block pain signals and induce a feeling of well-being.

Kat Arney, of Cancer Research UK, welcomes the new findings but is more cautious about their significance.

“This was a very small study and bigger randomised controlled trials are needed before we know for sure if acupuncture or acupressure is effective at relieving some of the side effects of cancer therapy,” she says.

Journal reference: Complementary Therapies in Medicine (DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2006.09.009)
 

scorpiotiger

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Dr. Oz: Energy Medicine

--- moved this post to a separate thread on energy medicine in general ---
 
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scorpiotiger

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I wonder if different needle depths produce different results? or is it so defined? does it depend on the individual? some people have thinner skin than others.. I would imagine pain threshold would be a factor?
 

Xania

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The place that is the acupuncture point is only found at one particular depth. The "deqi" sensation (an ache, nUmbness, warmth, whatever) tells the patient and practitioner when the needle is in the right place. There is no benefit, then, in altering the depth of the needle.

Pain - well, some are more sensitive than others, as with anything, but mostly the needle insertion is painless. The needles are really very fine, and we have a way of inserting them that reduces any sensation.
 

Iggy Dalrymple

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When I was undergoing acupuncture, there were two spots that were a bit painful but not exceeding so. On the side of my hand in the muscle in the web between the thumb and index finger. And on top of my forearm, near my elbow. Most of the dozens of other acupuncture points, I couldn't feel.
 

Xania

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Mostly, they are painless, as Iggy says.
But, there is one point in the palm of the hand that just plain HURTS, and there is no other way to describe it!
 

scorpiotiger

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The place that is the acupuncture point is only found at one particular depth. The "deqi" sensation (an ache, nUmbness, warmth, whatever) tells the patient and practitioner when the needle is in the right place. There is no benefit, then, in altering the depth of the needle.
ok.. that makes sense. you go down till you get the body response - the "deqi" sensation - that you are looking for.

then, what do you think is going on when just pressure is used... and still invokes some fraction of the same response?

Pain - well, some are more sensitive than others, as with anything, but mostly the needle insertion is painless. The needles are really very fine, and we have a way of inserting them that reduces any sensation.
well, that's good to know.. ;)
 

Xania

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I don't know what response occurs with pressure only. It is not a technique I have ever used (there is a reason they call us acuPUNCTURists!) but pressure does seem to have an effect in some circumstances.
 

scorpiotiger

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Xania, when you practice acupuncture.. does it always involve stimulating 2 points? Is the idea that you are stimulating energy flow between the 2 points?
 

Iggy Dalrymple

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Iggy, you had acupuncture? for what? did it help?
On Xania's advice, I submitted to acupuncture for asthma, and it worked big time. I haven't had acupuncture in about a year and have had no more asthma attacks. I also take a homeopathic when I feel a little wheezing coming on. Arrowwind told me about the homeopathic, Tartephedreel.

My sister has severe asthma, but acupuncture didn't help her, but acupuncture did help her shingles. I think that my sister has been on heavy steroids for so long that her natural steroid production (cortisol) has completely shut down.
 

scorpiotiger

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Xania just mentioned that the acupuncture works well with the shingles cases that she has had. so, I guess if you have shingles, acupuncture is something you should try.

also, there are quite a few studies of shingles (herpes zoster) and acupuncture. here is one:

Observation on therapeutic effect of pricking blood therapy combined with acupuncture on herpes zoster

Department of Dermatology, Jimo Third People's Hospital, Shandong 266200, China.
OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of pricking blood therapy combined with acupuncture and routine western medicine on herpes zoster.

METHODS: Two hundred and forty cases were randomly divided into 2 groups, 120 cases in each group.

  • The treatment group were treated with acupuncture combined with pricking blood therapy on the point with the most pain, and cupping and surround needling;
  • the control group with external application and oral administration of Aciclovir plaster and Aciclovir tablets, respectively. Their therapeutic effects were compared.
RESULTS: The total effective rate was 92.5% in the treatment group and 55.8% in the control group with a very significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.01). The time of producing killing pain, stopping vesication and scabbing in the treatment group was shorter than that in the control group.

CONCLUSION: The pricking blood therapy combined with acupuncture is an effective therapy for herpes zoster.
Xania... what is pricking blood therapy? (doesn't sound pleasant..:yuck:.)
 

Xania

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Pricking an acupuncture point with a triangular-shaped needle, with the intention of releasing two or three drops of blood. It is helpful in cases of localised pain (eg. following shingles or trauma) To a Western mind, it will be seen as a way of stimulating movement of blood, lymph etc.. An Easterner will see it as releasing an acute obstruction or stagnation. Choose your viewpiont!
 

Xania

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Xania, when you practice acupuncture.. does it always involve stimulating 2 points? Is the idea that you are stimulating energy flow between the 2 points?
I recall an esteemed lecturer on TCM telling us -acupuncture students- that the most elegant treatment is the treatment of one needle! He admitted that he had not yet been able to perform that treatment and neither have I.
But No, it isn't a matter of joining up two areas.
For instance, if someone is having a heart attack and waiting for medical help to arrive, the best acupuncture point to use is Pericardium 7, in the middle of the wrist crease. That will help to ease pain, help the heart to function a little better and and, I have heard, aids long term recovery,
 

scorpiotiger

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so, Xania, what are you doing when you stimulate a point? or is it not stimulating in the Eastern way of thinking? what are you doing when you insert the needle?

(a lot of questions.. I know, but it is not often that there is an acupuncturist on a forum! and I would like to have a better understanding of what is supposed to be happening according to the Eastern way of thinking).
 

Xania

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Scorpiotiger, thanks for asking this good question. It needs a bit more than two sentences to do justice to us, but I can't do that until Thursday or Friday. I just wanted to let you know that my lack of response is not a sign of me running away from it!!
 

scorpiotiger

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Scorpiotiger, thanks for asking this good question. It needs a bit more than two sentences to do justice to us, but I can't do that until Thursday or Friday. I just wanted to let you know that my lack of response is not a sign of me running away from it!!
ok, Xania, I am looking forward to your teaching us about acupuncture.

but in the meantime, here are 2 more studies about acupuncture where acupuncture proved better than western medicine for these particular problems:

Here are two clinical trials testing eastern energy medicine against western drugs... gasp. guess these researchers don't agree with ralph's opinion that energy medicine can't be tested by traditional means.


Comparative observation on acupuncture and western medicine for treatment of minimal brain dysfunction

OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of acupuncture and western medicine on minimal brain dysfunction (MBD) and to search for a clinically effective therapy for MBD.
METHODS
: Sixty-eight cases were randomly divided into an acupuncture group and a western medicine group, 34 cases in each group. The acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture at Dazhui (GV 14) and Shenque (CV 8), and the western medicine group by taking Haloperidol orally. One month constituted one course. After treatment, the total effective rate and scores of Connell's scale for diagnosis and behavior of MBD were compared between the two groups.
RESULTS
: The total effective rate and the score after treatment were
  • 97.1% and 10 +/- 0.37 in the acupuncture group and
  • 82.4% and 15 +/- 0.93 in the western medicine group
with a very significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.000 5), the acupuncture group being better than the western medicine group. Follow-up survey for 2-10 months showed the effects of the acupuncture group still were kept.
CONCLUSION: Acupuncture at Dazhui (GV 14) and Shenque (CV 8) can effectively cure MBD.

Study on mechanisms of electroacupuncture treatment of acute gouty arthritis
OBJECTIVE: To compare therapeutic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment and medication on acute gouty arthritis (AGA), so as to search for a therapeutic method for treatment of gout with renal insufficiency.
METHODS: Ninety cases of AGA were randomly divided into an EA group, an allopurinol group and a probenecid group, 30 cases in each group. The EA group were treated by EA at Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Fenglong (ST 40), Yinlingquan (SP 9), once a day; the allopurinol group by oral administration of Allopurinol, twice a day, 100 mg each time and the probenecid group by oral administration of Probenecid, twice daily, 0.25 g each time. Contents of blood uric acid (BUA) and urinary uric acid (UUA) in each group were detected.
RESULTS
: In all groups, there were significant differences in BUA and UUA levels before and after treatment (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between the EA group and the allopurinol group in blood uric acid level after treatment (P > 0.05) and there was no significant difference between the EA group and the probenecid group in the urinary innary uric acid level (P > 0.05). Comparison of therapeutic effects among the 3 groups indicated that the mean rank was 56.23 in the EA group, 43.17 in the allopurinol group and 37.10 in the probenecid group, indicating that the therapeutic effect in the EA group was better than that in the allopurinol group, and the allopurinol group was better than that in the probenecid group.

CONCLUSION
: EA can reduce the production of uric acid and promote the excretion of uric acid and has a better treatment effect. And there are no harmful effects on renal function. EA is an effective therapeutic method for treatment of gout with renal insufficiency.
 

Harry Hirsute

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ST,

You may find this to be a good resource for acupuncture-science:

http://www.liebertonline.com/action/doSearch?target=article&journal=acm&searchText=acupuncture&filter=single&x=0&y=0

700 hits to papers in this medical journal.

Here are a few I found to be rather interesting:

Objective: According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) acupuncture is a suitable treatment for complex chronic diseases such as bronchial asthma. In a randomized, controlled study we investigated immunologic effects of Chinese acupuncture on patients with allergic asthma.

Patients and Methods: The effects of acupuncture treatment given according to the principles of TCM (TCM group, n = 20) were compared with those of acupuncture treatment using points not specific for asthma (control group, n = 18). All patients were treated 12 times for 30 minutes over a time period of 4 weeks. Patients' general well-being and several peripheral blood parameters (eosinophils, lymphocyte subpopulations, cytokines, in vitro lymphocyte proliferation) were determined before and after acupuncture treatment.

Results: In the TCM group, significantly more patients indicated an improvement in general well-being (79% in the TCM group versus 47% in the control group; p = 0.049) after acupuncture treatment. The following changes were found in the TCM group: within the lymphocyte subpopulations the CD3+ cells (p = 0.005) and CD4+ cells (p = 0.014) increased significantly. There were also significant changes in cytokine concentrations: interleukin (IL)-6 (p = 0.026) and IL-10 (p = 0.001) decreased whereas IL-8 (p = 0.050) rose significantly. Additionally, the in vitro lymphocyte proliferation rate increased significantly (p = 0.035) while the number of eosinophils decreased from 4.4% to 3.3% after acupuncture (p > 0.05). The control group, however, showed no significant changes apart from an increase in the CD4+ cells (p = 0.012).

Conclusion: The results imply that asthma patients benefit from acupuncture treatment given in addition to conventional therapy. Furthermore, acupuncture performed in accordance with the principles of TCM showed significant immune-modulating effects.
http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2000.6.519?prevSearch=allfield:(acupuncture)

Background and objectives: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that manifests in delays in social interaction, language used in social communication, and symbolic or imaginative play, with an onset prior to age 3 years. Language therapy (LT) for children with autism is the main form of rehabilitation, because it emphasizes its major presenting symptom (i.e., language impairment). Scalp acupuncture (scalp AP) is a modality based on the physiologic function of different brain areas, where different scalp zones are stimulated with needles so as to stimulate the reflexively related nervous tissue. This study aimed to evaluate the role of scalp AP as a complementary modality to LT in rehabilitation of children with autism.

Subjects and design: The study involved 20 children (divided into 2 equal groups: A and B), diagnosed as autistic according to DSM IV classification. Their ages ranged between 4 and 7 years old. All subjects underwent LT twice weekly, aiming at stimulation of cognitive and verbal abilities. Group B only was subjected to scalp AP sessions—twice weekly—as a rehabilitation complementary tool during the 9-month period of the study. The acupoints used were: Du 20, 26, GV17; three temple needles; and Yamamoto's New Scalp Acupuncture cerebrum and aphasia points (acupuncture needles 0.3 × 30 mm). A language test was performed before and after therapy to monitor cognition and expression (an Arabic test was included).

Results: Both groups, whose mean age range was 5.5 years ± 1.22 years, showed a significant improvement in cognitive and expressive language skills pre- and post-therapy, which was highly significant among group B children treated with scalp AP (attention 2.8 ± 0.8 in group A versus 3.5 ± 0.8 in group B; receptive semantics were 7 ± 3.8 in group A versus 9.4 ± 3.1 in group B). Expressive semantics significantly improved in both groups.

Conclusions: Scalp AP is a safe complementary modality when combined with LT and has a significantly positive effect on language development in children with autism.
http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2007.0508?prevSearch=allfield:(acupuncture)

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the distributions of nitric oxide (NO) in the skin points (acupoints)/meridian regions and determine whether neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein levels were associated with NO concentrations in the areas.

Design: Low skin resistance points (LSRP) on the skin surface in response to electrical stimuli were performed in anesthetized adult rats. The skin together with subcutaneous tissue was isolated in meridian regions from PC 2 to 6, BL 36 to 57, CV 3 to 22, and GV 2 to 14. Control skin tissues were obtained in the areas close to related meridians without containing LSRP. Concentrations of nitrite (NO2-), nitrate (NO3-), and total NO2- plus NO3- (NOx-) were quantified in the skin tissues, micropunches of brain nuclei, and blood vessels in a blinded fashion. Western blots were also conducted using polyclonal anti-nNOS and anti-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) antibody in the skin tissues.

Results: NOx- and NO3- concentrations were higher (45 ± 8% and 43 ± 7% in the CV, 47 ± 7% and 51 ± 9% in the BL, and 47 ± 8% and 45 ± 6% in the PC) than those in control regions (p < 0.05, n = 6). NOx- concentrations are 2- to 3-fold greater in skin tissues than those in brain regions and blood vessels (p < 0.05, n = 6-8). nNOS protein levels were consistently increased in the skin regions of BL, PC, and GV meridians compared with their controls (p < 0.05, n = 5-7) but endothelial NO synthase expression was not changed.

Conclusion: This is the first evidence showing that NO contents and nNOS expression are consistently higher in the skin acupoints/meridians associated with low electric resistance. The results suggest that enhanced NO in the acupoints/meridians is generated from multiple resources including neuronal NOergic system, and NO might be associated with acupoint/meridian functions including low electric resistance.
http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/10755530360623329?prevSearch=allfield:(acupuncture)
 
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Xania

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I think I can best explain what I do by describing one patient and one treament from a day, rather than generalise about non-specifics.

A few days ago Katherine age 60 came for a rouitne treatment to try to help her trigeminal neuralgia, which she has had most of her life. As a baby and small child she was physically and mentally abused by her mother. She suffered brain damage from being shaken, as a baby.
She worked as an auxiliary nurse in her younger working life. She married and had three children. Following the birth of the first child the head pains started. Over the years she saw physicians, psychiatrists and finally a neurosurgeon. He was able to release some of the scar tissue in the occiput, and she had some relief from the pains for a time.
But of course, surgery causes its own scars and the pains returned. For some years now, she has been taking synthetic narcotic analgesics, anti-inflammatories, something for blood pressure and a statin.
Kathleen has been having acupuncture every two weeks for about ten years now. She says it helps, but doesn't cure, the head pains, helps with general health and well-being, and "It helps to keep me sane."
At the last visit I used points to help control the head pain Those points are "symptomatic treatment" and not intended to address any constitutional imbalance. Such a treatment is usually intended to drain or disperse energy which is blocked or not moving freely, as can be imagined in the case of scar tissue.
As there had been a recent virus infection, which left her fatigued and a poor colour, I added points to tonify her general energy and help recovery.

Needle technique. The needles used for dispersing or draining energy are inserted to the appropriate depth and left in place for about 20 minutes. As there is usually a lot of conversation and laughter between us, needles placed in Stomach 4, at the corner of the mouth, often fall out and that leads to more laughter as we try to find the fallen needle.

I used two points on the back - bilaterally, so that's four needles - to aid recovery and improve overall energy. Those needles are turned clockwise 180 degree to induce a tonifying action. There can be a lift and thrust movement, too, but I didn't use it on this occasion.
Next was a point in the hand at the base of the thumb - Large Intestine four. That point directs energy to the face which is where much of the trigeminal pain is felt.

There is an almost unlimited variety of conditions to be treated, and as much variety in the people who come for treatment. Of course, there are those who need medical attention and I always advise patients to see a doctor if it is obvious that is called for. There have been times when someone wanted help with feeling tired, and it was clear from signs and symptoms there there was an untreated heart condition. I hope she visited her doctor. Some do and some don't.

In another post, another day, I will describe more people and more treatments.
 
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scorpiotiger

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Here is a site which illustrates the location of acupuncture points.

http://www.yinyanghouse.com/acupuncturepoints/largeintestine_meridian_graphic
this is a great site, Xania.. I love the way they've made it easy to find the information for the different points.

here is the main page (like a table of contents for the body):
http://www.yinyanghouse.com/acupuncturepoints/locations_theory_and_clinical_applications

so, I notice they say for LI4.. acne. should I tell my teenage son to press there to help improve his skin? ;)

actually, I have a dermawand. I wonder if he tried zapping that point, if he would see a change. He used to roll his eyes when I would suggest certain things to him, but he now uses quite a few things I've mentioned to him. (some of them I thought were weird, but they seemed to work for him).

I will assume the conception vessel are those points that govern the sexual part of your being.

what does the "governing vessel" do? is it mostly to do with the mind?
 

scorpiotiger

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I think I can best explain what I do by describing one patient and one treament from a day, rather than generalise about non-specifics.

A few days ago Katherine age 60 came for a rouitne treatment to try to help her trigeminal neuralgia, which she has had most of her life. As a baby and small child she was physically and mentally abused by her mother. She suffered brain damage from being shaken, as a baby.
She worked as an auxiliary nurse in her younger working life. She married and had three children. Following the birth of the first child the head pains started. Over the years she saw physicians, psychiatrists and finally a neurosurgeon. He was able to release some of the scar tissue in the occiput, and she had some relief from the pains for a time.
But of course, surgery causes its own scars and the pains returned. For some years now, she has been taking synthetic narcotic analgesics, anti-inflammatories, something for blood pressure and a statin.
Kathleen has been having acupuncture every two weeks for about ten years now. She says it helps, but doesn't cure, the head pains, helps with general health and well-being, and "It helps to keep me sane."
At the last visit I used points to help control the head pain Those points are "symptomatic treatment" and not intended to address any constitutional imbalance. Such a treatment is usually intended to drain or disperse energy which is blocked or not moving freely, as can be imagined in the case of scar tissue.
As there had been a recent virus infection, which left her fatigued and a poor colour, I added points to tonify her general energy and help recovery.
Xania, are the majority of your patients looking for pain relief? Would you say this is the area where acupuncture is good?

Xania said:
Needle technique. The needles used for dispersing or draining energy are inserted to the appropriate depth and left in place for about 20 minutes. As there is usually a lot of conversation and laughter between us, needles placed in Stomach 4, at the corner of the mouth, often fall out and that leads to more laughter as we try to find the fallen needle.

I used two points on the back - bilaterally, so that's four needles - to aid recovery and improve overall energy. Those needles are turned clockwise 180 degree to induce a tonifying action. There can be a lift and thrust movement, too, but I didn't use it on this occasion.
Next was a point in the hand at the base of the thumb - Large Intestine four. That point directs energy to the face which is where much of the trigeminal pain is felt.
is the "lift and thrust" to produce more stimulation at that point? or do you just use this on patients that don't pay their bills? ;) :p JUST KIDDING, XANIA!!!

Xania said:
There is an almost unlimited variety of conditions to be treated, and as much variety in the people who come for treatment. Of course, there are those who need medical attention and I always advise patients to see a doctor if it is obvious that is called for. There have been times when someone wanted help with feeling tired, and it was clear from signs and symptoms there there was an untreated heart condition. I hope she visited her doctor. Some do and some don't.

In another post, another day, I will describe more people and more treatments.
thank you, Xania. This is very interesting!
 

Xania

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Another problem - another treatment.

A 59 year old male needing help with pain in a frozen shoulder.
Robert is a healthy looking, upright, intelligent man, who has been a police officer for most of his working life. Four months ago he had a sudden angina attack and had a stent in a heart artery. He is recovering well from that. Unfortunately, he was taking a statin medication, which he stopped last week because of the risk of muscle damage complicating his already frozen shoulder.

This acupuncture treatment was 90% pain relief and 10% energy correction. Because of the angina and now the "frozen shoulder" his energy is saying quite clearly that there is a condition of stagnation and obstruction, so some of the points were intended to promote movement of Qi as well as movement of blood.
Liver 3 and Spleen 10 are good for "movement".
Other ponts for the shoulder condition - Gall bladder 21. Small intestine 11, 12. Large intestine 15.. And some Ah Shi points. His neck and shoulder muscles were bunched up and felt very hard to me, while I was palpating for the points.
After the first treatment he had the first full night's sleep in a month, so he was pleased with this treatment and came back for more.

Now, I want to try to learn something from him - he said he was told that there is a correlation between angina and frozen shoulder. This is news to me! If anyone knows more about it, please tell us here.
 

Xania

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Another new thing I have learned this week is a neurological condition named Arnold Chiari syndrome. A 60 year old woman wanted to find out if acupuncture can help her pains and tingling in her face, neck arms caused by nerve damage from this condition
http://www.spinalcord.ar.gov/Publications/FactSheets/sheets16-20/fact16.html
I don't know the answer, and told her that no one else could say for sure. Did she want to try?
Yes, she did, so we did a first treatment. I didn't want to stimulate much at this session, so I used very few points - none near the site of the lesion, or the surgery. She had a decompression of the foramen magnum a few months ago That helped a lot, but she feels that the condtion is progressing again, and there isn't room for another decompression. I shall see her again next week and report progress, or lack of it.
 

Harry Hirsute

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In a study involving 10 healthy volunteers, acupuncture at specific acupuncture points (TH-3 and GB-43) related to the auditory system according to traditional Chinese medicine was found to influence Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials (CAEP), while acupuncture at points not specifically linked to the auditory system in Chinese medicine (HT-7 and ST-44), did not have the same influence on the auditory system.

Subjects received 4 sessions of acupuncture at points specifically related to the auditory system (TH-3 and GB-43) and at points non-specific for the auditory system (HT-7 and ST-44), with a one week interval between each session.

Before and after each acupuncture treatment, the latencies and amplitudes of CAEP were registered. After stimulation of TH-3, the mean peak latencies of P2 component decreased by 11 ms while components of N2 increased by 9 ms. After stimulation of GB-43, the mean peak latencies of P2 component decreased by 14 ms, while N2 component increased by 4 ms. On the other hand, stimulation of HT-7 and ST-44 did not lead to such changes.

The authors conclude, "These findings confirm the specificity of acupuncture points TH3 and GB43 in relation to auditory system."
http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/37621
 

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