Got my first tiny cavity!

someguy

New member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
So last time I went to get my teeth cleaned the dentist said I have a tiny cavity.. ive never had one in my whole life.. dunno why I got one now. I eat healthy, no soda, candy etc.. but my health has decreased a little bit over the year..

Anyway, im trying to figure out the best way to treat it.. some books ive read said you dont have to, that it may not get any worse if you just eat right/fix digestion/take care of teeth.. but other people advise me to get it filled with a bio-identical substance..

any advice?
 

pinballdoctor

Active member
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Location
Saskatchewan Canada
Whatever you decide, don't let them put mercury in your mouth. They will call it a silver filling, however, its 52% mercury.

If it is a small cavity, just let it be.
 

someguy

New member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Original Poster
yea, dont worry I wont let them put any mercury.. no way..

Can a cavity actually re-fill itself? The most I would ever do is have it filled with a "bio-identical" substance.. ideally I would do nothing .. but I dont want it to get worse.. rather treat it now then have to get a root canal or tooth pulled later..

The mouth is very important for overall health.. interlinked with the rest of the body so I am trying to take it very seriously.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

Active member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Here are some resources that will help you understand how best to enable your teeth to protect themselves and repair the damage.

Zellies website

The Dental Essentials. Is a cavity free childhood really possible? Absolutely.
Do read the sections on Mellanby and Weston Price.

Stephan Wholehealthsource Dental blogs Dr. Mellanby's Tooth Decay Reversal Diet

Make sure your 25(OH)D3 (vitamin d3) level is adequate, most people require in the region of 5000iu/d to stay around 50~60ng/ml. Vitamin K is also necessary to make sure calcium stays where it should be (bone stock best source)

Paying particular attention to your oral health is the key to preventing a lot of other conditions.
Dietary Carbohydrates and Dental-Systemic Diseases Remember refined grains are no better than sugar.
 

BigAl

New member
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Hey good buddy, my wife has dry mouth due to S... syndrome and is very, very prone to tooth cavities. The thing that seemed to help her most in keeping cavities down is ACT mouth wash. This mouth wash kills the germs clinging to the teeth. Jim Humble may also have an idea. In my view it's the germs that do the damage so it looks like you have been kissing girls. Shame on you.
 

BigAl

New member
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Here's what I think is an interesting story. Back in the 50's when the cause of tooth cavities was still a mystery I worked with a fellow who had spent some time in the Army and while in service he had no tooth cavities but most other guys did. The Army meds were baffled. They made tests of all kinds on him even asking him just exactly what he ate etc., etc. But I knew the guy and had a good idea of his dating habits while he was in the Army which I guessed were like zero. So I surmised that the lack of kissing and thus the lack of new germs was the answer.
I then asked my dentist, Mr. Smith, what was the cause for cavities. His answer was very direct. "Sugar causes cavities."
"No," I said. "germs cause cavities."
He was certain. "Sugar causes cavities."
About two years later a front page article in the Wall Street Journal said ( I used to read the journal then because I knew that some day 55 years later Rupert Murdock would own it.) the article said that germs cause cavities. I showed that article to my dentist. His answer is a classic: Well that's not what they taught us in med school.
My observation was just a lucky guess.
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
I do recommend that you fill it unless your dentist tells you its to small to worry about. I have had a very small one for many years. It has not gotten bigger but it has not gotten smaller either.

Biomemetic Dentistry is the way to go. Do a search on it. One of these days its the only kind of dentistry that will be done.

This is my dentist. He trains other destists and at dental schools across the USA
http://www.allemancenter.com/about_biomimetic_dentistry.html

as time goes by I believe less and less that sugar causes cavities.. germs do. Ever notice that when they preserve fruits they add sugar because germs cannot grow in it? Sugar can feed fungus but there is no indication that it will feed bacteria to any huge extent. It think it may be more related to ph issues, and general oral hygene.
 

snappy1

New member
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
I agree with Arrowwind. Unless your dentist asks you to ignore the cavity, its better for you to go for a filling. The next time you consume something with sugar, you don't want to be worrying about feeding the germs.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

Active member
Joined
May 25, 2009
I agree with Arrowwind. Unless your dentist asks you to ignore the cavity, its better for you to go for a filling. The next time you consume something with sugar, you don't want to be worrying about feeding the germs.
The answer is not to consume anything with sugar. No one needs sugar so eliminating sugar stops not only dental health problems but cancer as well. Why give cancer the food it thrives best on?
Those germs will thrive whether you have a filling or not. There is absolutely no way you can stop the germs in your mouth getting into your digestive system.

What is hard for you to grasp in the paper

Dietary Carbohydrates and Dental-Systemic Diseases Remember refined grains are no better than sugar. I can provide plenty more evidence that sugar is driving chronic inflammation and that is driving chronic illness. It's not the tooth decay that's the real problem it's the obesity, diabetes, and Alzheimer's that follow.

The average US teenager is consuming around 34 teaspoons of sugar daily and the average US adult 22tsps daily.What's hard to grasp about the idea that this is an excessive amount of sugar and rather than simply keep trying to provide temporary solutions to the teeth you should really be reducing the cause of the damage and enhancing the natural protection your teeth should have.
 


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