Alzheimers - an alternative treatment plan?

lizzy1

New member
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Hi All,

Wondering if you can help.. my mum has alzheimers at the age of 60. I have spent hours trying to research the best 'alternative' methods that might help her. We have started mum on low dose of coconut oil (as per Mary Newport advice) and she seems to be responding well - more engaged and positive. We are trying to up this dose. From my research on the web other things which seem to be good if you already have alzheimers are:

Turmeric
Niacinamide
Alpha Lipic Acid
Sage

Does anyone know if turmeric in capsule form would help? If so could you recommend brand?
Niacinamide - due to the study in mice on this I am going to be starting my mum on this on a low dose to start with at 250mg.
Alpha Lipic Acid - any testimonials on this?
Sage - any advice on this one?
I guess I am trying to come up with an alternative treatment plan in one. The consultant dishes out the Alzheimers drug but it won't cure. I am looking for anything alternative and would be willing to give it a go.
Many thanks
xxx
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Hi lizzy1, welcome to the forum! :) Here's our wiki page about Alzheimer's, with some informative links at the bottom. I'm trying to take a spoonful of unrefined extra virgin coconut oil daily, just as a preventative. That seems like it's an important supplement for treatment of the disease. Happy to hear your taking good care of your mother, I wish her the best.

https://www.natmedtalk.com/wiki/Alzheimer%27s_Disease
 

mommysunshine

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Oct 23, 2010
Location
Sunny, tropical, CA.
The two things that come to mind are increasing her circulation through exercise. Even a daily walk around the block is a start. The second thing I thought of is increasing her omega 3 fatty acids. Fish oils are a very good source.

Other things to consider are:
ginko biloba
lecithin
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Alpha Lipoic Acid would be good to supplement with...http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18655815
PS: I learned on this forum that Alpha Lipoic Acid is a chelator of heavy metals and should be taken with something cleansing like Chlorella.
And in this thread, there are some suggesions for turmeric brands, and a positive mention of sage...
https://www.natmedtalk.com/showthread.php?t=20130https://www.natmedtalk.com/f45/20130-turmeric-alzheimers.html
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
I would work at increasing her coconut oil dosage as quickly as possible. There is no indicaiton that withholding would do any good nor any indication that up to 3 tablespoons as day would harm.

If you don't want to give that much coconut oil you can get medium chain triglycerides in capsule form.. she could possibly take some of each. The only downside to coconut oil that I am aware of is that it can give some people the runs.

Give the tumeric at the same time that you give the coconut oil as it facilitates absorption. she should also take bioperine with it, 5mg, again to facilitate absorption.

Otherwise it looks like you have a good protocol to me.
The only other idea I can think of, and because we have no clue what causes alzheimers, although we do understand what the physical changes are be know not what causes them I would look into MMS and consider that. MMS has helped a number of cases of "brain" disease including alzheimers. We must also consider that what causes a condiiton in one person may have a different cause in another. go to www.jimhumble.biz for further info.


One other thing you might consider is Lipsomal vitamin c with gluathione. Glutathione is the most powerful antioxidant the body can utilize. Typically it is made by the body. But lipsomal forms is the first oral application that works. go to
www.letstalkhealth.com and look at their lipsomal products. I would try two months of it and see what you think.

Under no circumstances would I give my mom any alzheimers medication. They have absolutely NO proof that these drugs are of any benefit. I have watched many an alzheimers patient march into the decline and death while on them till the bitter end.
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009

Bill Scoggan Reverses Alzheimer’s With A Low-Carb Diet And Supplements


While you may find you want to speed through some parts of this interview it's useful if you understand how reducing refined carbohydrate is as important as increasing intake of Medium Chain Triglycerides. (MCT from Coconut oil)
Remember that Aricept (Alzheimer's drug) works by increasing the life of CHOLINE in the brain and rather than using drugs (with side effects) to prolong the life of choline it's MORE IMPORTANT to ensure your diet has good sources of choline Why you should eat more (not less) cholesterol

PS I find it difficult to understand why if God is telling her to get this message out, why she doesn't explain the basics of her program in a bit more detail online. Seems to me there is more emphasis on money making at this site than actually trying to help others prevent or treat Alzheimer's.
Seems to me the cheapest source of the supplement her husband found most helpful,
SOLGAR Phosphatidylserine, 200 mg, 60 Softgels IHERB $43.98 AMAZON 2 FOR $76.00 US shipping free.

The effect of phosphatidylserine-containing omega-3 fatty acids on memory abilities in subjects with subjective memory complaintsPS-omega-3 supplementation resulted in 42% increase in the ability to recall words in the delayed condition
Purity Products, PS Omega-3 Formula, 60 Soft Gels IHERB price: $41.95
These contain in 2 Soft Gels PhosphatidylSerine (PS from soy) 100 mg Omega-3 Fatty Acids 1100
so it may be cheaper to take high strength omega 3 and PhosphatidylSerine from separate supplements.

The research daily dosage contained 300 mg PS and 37.5 mg Eicosapentaenoic acid + DHA so wasn't exactly the same as the example of similar product from IHERB (you'd need 6 capsules daily to make 300mg PS.)

Looks like you'd get more Phospholipids, omega-3 rich 420 mg and omega-3 fatty acids, total 300 mg 2 softgels daily for your money from Source Naturals, Arctic Pure, Krill Oil, 500 mg, 60 Softgels Iherb $20.44
(these aren't going to cure the underlying condition but may delay progression so will be required until life ends hence the need to get best value for money)
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Phosphatidylserine Containing –3 Fatty Acids
May Improve Memory Abilities in Non-Demented Elderly with Memory Complaints
another study from the same group as above.

Safety of phosphatidylserine containing omega-3 fatty acids in non-demented elderlyresults of this study indicate that consumption of PS-DHA at a dosage of 300 mg PS/day for 15 weeks, or 100 mg PS/day for 30 weeks, is safe, well tolerated, and does not produce any negative effects

Different set of researchers (Japanese) coming to same conclusions
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
This paper has a brief summary of most of the useful strategies.
Alzheimer's disease: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical, nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies, with a discussion of treatment strategies from the perspective of patients and practitioners.

Bear in mind when reading the section on Vitamins they didn't review vitamin D3 the creation of which declines naturally as we age by 75 you only make 25% of that your skin made at age 25 so as you get older you naturally require MORE from supplements and the same applies to MELATONIN. except that's made in pineal gland/digestive system rather than skin.

Vitamin D, cognitive dysfunction and dementia in older adults
The physiologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), is a fat-soluble steroid hormone with a well established role in skeletal health.
A growing body of evidence suggests low vitamin D levels also play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of non-skeletal, age-associated diseases including cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and stroke.
Low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], a stable marker of vitamin D status, are also associated with increased odds of prevalent cognitive dysfunction, Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia in a number of studies, raising the possibility that vitamin D plays a role in the aetiology of cognitive dysfunction and dementia.
To date, the majority of human studies reporting associations between vitamin D and cognition or dementia have been cross-sectional or case-control designs that do not permit us to exclude the possibility that such associations are a result of disease progression rather than being causal.
Animal and in vitro experiments have identified a number of neuroprotective mechanisms that might link vitamin D status to cognitive dysfunction and dementia, including vasoprotection and amyloid phagocytosis and clearance, but the clinical relevance of these mechanisms in humans is not currently clear.
Two recent, large, prospective studies go some way to establish the temporal relationship with cognitive decline.
The relative risk of cognitive decline was 60% higher (relative risk = 1.6, 95% CI 1.2, 2.0) in elderly Italian adults with severely deficient 25(OH)D levels (<25 nmol/L) when compared with those with sufficient levels (≥75 nmol/L).
Similarly, the odds of cognitive decline were 41% higher (odds ratio = 1.4, 95% CI 0.9, 2.2) when elderly US men in the lowest quartile (≤49.7 nmol/L) were compared with those in the highest quartile (≥74.4 nmol/L).
To our knowledge, no prospective studies have examined the association between 25(OH)D levels and incident dementia or neuroimaging abnormalities.
The possible therapeutic benefits of vitamin D have attracted considerable interest as over 1 billion people worldwide are thought to have insufficient 25(OH)D levels and these levels can be increased using inexpensive and well tolerated dietary supplements.
Bear in mind for UK readers with a current average 25(OH)D level 30nmol/l 12ng/ml will require in the region of 5000iu/daily D3 to safely into the highest quartile and stay there.
 

u&iraok

New member
Joined
May 22, 2009
Location
In my head
I have cognitive problems with my ME/CFS and I would research if they are also good for Alzheimers but I've improved with:

Phosphatidylserine (Neuro PS)
Bio PQQ
Standard Process Neurotrophin PMG
Grape Seed Extract
Acetyl-L-carinitine
NAC
Alpha Lipoic Acid
TMG

I also detoxed metals and other toxins and took a lot of vitamins and minerals including D and B, took tons of antioxidants and have done things to try and increase glutathione, took a lot of good oils and a good diet with sufficient protein and lots of vegetables and fruits so I don't know to what extent these also helped.
 

lizzy1

New member
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Original Poster
Just wanted to say many thanks for the replies I have received so far on this topic, I am very grateful. I need to go through and digest all the information however this is really positive getting this advice/ideas and tips in one place.......
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Turmeric capsules, 3 a day plus a couple turmeric extract capsules. Also, Vitamin D 5000 IU daily for a couple weeks and UP the coconut oil
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Treatment with Huperzine A Improves Cognition in Vascular Dementia Patients.
Abstract
In the present study, we tested the efficacy and safety of Huperzine A in treatment of mild to moderate vascular dementia (VaD).
This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with 78 patients with mild to moderate VaD.
The participants were randomized to receive either vitamin C (100-mg bid) as placebo (n = 39) or Huperzine A (0.1-mg bid) (n = 39) for 12 consecutive weeks.
The mini-mental state examination (MMSE), clinical dementia rating (CDR), and activities of daily living (ADL) scores were used for the assessment of cognition.
The assessments were made prior to treatment, and 4, 8, and 12 weeks of the treatment.
The adverse effects of the treatment were also recorded.
After 12 weeks of treatment, the MMSE, CDR, and ADL scores significantly improved in the Huperzine A group (P < 0.01 for all comparisons), whereas the placebo group did not show any such improvement (P > 0.05 for all comparisons).
No serious adverse events were recorded during the treatment.
Conclusion:
Huperzine A can significantly improve the cognitive function in patients with mild to moderate vascular dementia.
Further, the medicament is safe.
Although this study used 100mg/d Huperzine A the paper I link to in post #9 of this thread talks about studies finding much higher amounts were required.
So as this is a safe medication it may be worth going for a higher amount such as
Source Naturals, Huperzine A, 200 mcg, 120 Tablets IHERB price $21.27
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Turmeric capsules, 3 a day plus a couple turmeric extract capsules.
I think Curcumin (turmeric) is extremely useful partly because it also binds with the Vitamin D receptor so tends to support the actions of vitamin D3.

It may be a good idea to use a form such as
Doctor's Best, Meriva, Phytosome Curcumins, 500 mg, 60 Veggie Caps IHERB price: $14.99 as this is carried in Phospholipids so is supporting the earlier suggestions to increase PhosphatidylSerine which is part of the phosphorlipid family.

Also, Vitamin D 5000 IU daily for a couple weeks
As the need for vitamin d increases with age 5000iu daily should continue ad infinitum or until a 25(OH)D test shows levels are above 60ng/ml or 150nmol/l in which case it may be reduced to maintain a 25(OH)d level around the 60ng/ml mark.
and UP the coconut oil
Sure But incorporate it in foods or drinks so it is a part of the meal rather than as a supplement.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Resveratrol acts not through anti-aggregative pathways but mainly via its scavenging properties against Aβ and Aβ-metal complexes toxicity.
1) in our experimental conditions we did not observe any anti-amyloidogenic and fibril-destibilizing effect played by resveratrol, as proposed by other groups
2) resveratrol exerts its neuroprotective activity not only against Aβ but also against Aβ-metal complexes;
3) resveratrol acts as a ROS scavenger against those generated by Aβ-Fe, Aβ-Cu and Aβ-Zn, thereby reducing their toxicity;
4) eventually, resveratrol is not sufficient to fully block Aβ-Al and Aβ-Cu toxicity.
So if money is no object it looks like resveratrol MAY help.

Biotivia, Transmax, Trans-Resveratrol, 500 mg, 60 Capsules but it's IHERB price $72.00 (discount for quantity) Much cheaper AMAZON
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
The effect of acetyl-L-Carnitine and Lipoic acid treatment in ApoE4 mouse as a model of human Alzheimer’s disease This is a study where they looked at combining CARNITINE with LIPOIC ACID.

Acetyl-L-carnitine ameliorates spatial memory deficits induced by inhibition of phosphoinositol-3 kinase and protein kinase C. this explains the mechanism by which carnitine may be effective
500 mg, twice daily is a standard amount.
example
Country Life, Gluten Free, L-Carnitine Caps, 500 mg, 60 Veggie Caps $18.87

Lipoic acid: energy metabolism and redox regulation of transcription and cell signaling This paper is explaining how Lipoic acid helps with the mitochondrial dsyfunction that underlies part of the disease process in diabetes (and Alzheimer's) The biologically active `R` form is probably the most reliable form of this antioxidant to effectively help metabolic disease.
Here is an example for price comparison
Doctor's Best, Best Stabilized R-Lipoic Acid, 100 mg, 60 Veggie Caps IHERB $17.60
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
I've talked about the importance of correcting vitamin/hormone deficiencies that naturally occur with ageing Vitamin D3 and Melatonin will ALWAYS be lower in older people and SHOULD automatically be corrected in EVERYONE over 60yrs old irrespective of whether or not they've a Dementia diagnosis. Now we know Mild Cognitive impairment precedes Alzheimer's and is strongly associated with low vitamin D status then the time to correct low vit d levels is BEFORE the cognitive impairment sets it. Everyone reading this can afford the £10 total annual cost so why risk dementia to save a few pence?

However I haven't yet mentioned MAGNESIUM
Altered ionized magnesium levels in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.
Abstract
Magnesium deficiency is present in several chronic, age-related diseases, including cardiovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases.
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia.
The aim of the present study was to study magnesium homeostasis in patients with mild to moderate AD.
One hundred and one elderly (≥65 years) patients were consecutively recruited (mean age: 73.4±0.8 years; M/F: 42/59).
In all patients, a comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed including cognitive and functional status.
Admission criteria for the AD group (diagnosed according to the DSM-IV and the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) included: mild to moderate cognitive impairment (MMSE score: 11-24/30, corrected for age and education).
Blood samples were analyzed for serum total magnesium (Mg-tot) and serum ionized magnesium (Mg-ion).
AD patients had significantly lower MMSE scores (20.5±0.7 vs 27.9±0.2; p<0.001), and for the physical function tests.
Mg-ion was significantly lower in the AD group as compared to age-matched control adults without AD (0.50±0.01 mmol/L vs 0.53±0.01 mmol/L; p<0.01).
No significant differences were found in Mg-tot between the two groups (1.91±0.03 mEq/L vs 1.95±0.03 mEq/L; p=NS).
For all subjects, Mg-ion levels were significantly and directly related only to cognitive function (Mg-ion/MMSE r=0.24 p<0.05), while no significant correlations were found in this group of patients between magnesium and ADL or IADL.
Our results show the presence of subclinical alterations in Mg-ion in patients with mild to moderate AD.
It's always a good idea to supplement with magnesium when you correct vitamin D deficiency because doing that increases your ability to absorb calcium from the diet/water and calcium requires magnesium to counterbalance it's actions. There is usually sufficient calcium in the diet (yoghurt/milk/cheese fish veggies) but modern foods often lack magnesium and MOST adults only get about half the recommended daily amount so we are mostly magnesium deficient. Magnesium is closely associated with depression levels and depression is often a cofactor in Alzheimer's progression so it's one to avoid.

Example product Doctor's Best, High Absorption Magnesium, 240 Tablets
Our price: $17.17 Amino acid chelate supplied by Albion Advanced Nutrition. these are the most reliably absorbed.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Lithium 'slows development of Alzheimer's'
A trial of 41 people over 60 years of age with mild cognitive impairment, a condition that often leads to full-blown Alzheimer's, found that the rate of mental decline was lower in the half given 150mg of lithium daily, compared to those given a placebo.
While all participants showed a decline in memory function and attention tasks over the year, the rate of decline among those on lithium was significantly less. Levels of a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease called phospho-tau concentrations also rose more slowly in those on lithium.
Psychiatrists believe this is because it "may hamper mechanisms that lead to the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles", microscopic brain structures linked to the most common form of dementia.
Dr Orestes Forlenza, who led the research, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, said: "This study supports the idea that giving lithium to a person who is at risk of Alzheimer’s disease may have a protective effect, and slow down the progression of memory loss to dementia."
Professor Allan Young, a psychiatrist from Imperial College London, described the study as "encouraging" - and particularly interesting because no pharmaceutical company has a patent on lithium, meaning it is very cheap to prescribe.
He added: "This trial adds to the increasing evidence that lithium may have beneficial effects on the brain and begs to be replicated in further randomised trials."
But Rebecca Wood, chief executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK, said it was "too soon to draw any firm conclusions" because of the small study size.
Dr Anne Corbett, research manager at the Alzheimer's Society, said: "We need more, larger clinical trials to test existing drugs like lithium if we are to find better treatments for people with Alzheimer’s.
"Yet such trials are very expensive. We need greater investment in this area in order to help us develop better treatments for people with this devastating condition."
In the above study they used 150mg of lithium daily,
Example Doctor's Best, Best Lithium Orotate, 200 Tablets Our price: $11.98
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
ISure But incorporate (coconut oil) it in foods or drinks so it is a part of the meal rather than as a supplement.
I have found this just about impossible to do. When its time to eat a meal I simply take a large spoonful of coconut oil first, sometimes right after (somewhere between 1 and 2 teaspoons for me) then sit down to eat.
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
WHOA They say somoking helps prevent alzheimers. (NO, I am not looking for excuses to smoke. I would rather die of alzheimers than lung cancer. At least I can hide my own easter eggs)
No they are not saying anything about smoking. So no excuses for you.
 

liverock

New member
Joined
Jul 18, 2008
Location
Out of sight
Lithium 'slows development of Alzheimer's'
In the above study they used 150mg of lithium daily,
Example Doctor's Best, Best Lithium Orotate, 200 Tablets Our price: $11.98
Texas is the state with the highest lithium levels in the drinking water(El Paso has the highest). It appears to cut down on crime levels as well as AD.

http://www.newswithviews.com/Howenstine/james11.htm
Ten years of research by 27 counties in Texas disclosed that the incidence of homicide, rape, robbery, burglary, arrests for drug possession, and suicide[4] were higher in counties whose drinking water contained little or no lithium. Counties whose drinking water naturally contained higher amounts of lithium had significantly lower rates of all these crimes. These counties with higher levels of lithium in their tap water experienced fewer hospitalizations for homicides, mental illness[5], psychosis, neurosis, schizophrenia, and personality disorder
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Was watching the Dr. Oz show today, and he mentioned that a vitamin B12 deficiency can actually mimic Alzheimer's. They were saying that some signs of vitamin B12 deficiency was poor memory and confusion. Since it's not very readily absorbed in the elderly, they recommended vit B12 shots, after blood tests confirmed a deficiency. But...they also said that supplementing was very safe and overdose was very unlikely.

I'm taking a sublingual vitamin B12 lozenge daily (Solaray), 2,000mcg, along with a B-50 complex. Something that certainly wouldn't hurt in your mom's situation at all, and might very well help her. More info on B12...https://www.natmedtalk.com/wiki/Vitamin_B12
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Was watching the Dr. Oz show today, and he mentioned that a vitamin B12 deficiency can actually mimic Alzheimer's. They were saying that some signs of vitamin B12 deficiency was poor memory and confusion. Since it's not very readily absorbed in the elderly, they recommended vit B12 shots, after blood tests confirmed a deficiency. But...they also said that supplementing was very safe and overdose was very unlikely.

I'm taking a sublingual vitamin B12 lozenge daily (Solaray), 2,000mcg, along with a B-50 complex. Something that certainly wouldn't hurt in your mom's situation at all, and might very well help her. More info on B12...https://www.natmedtalk.com/wiki/Vitamin_B12
The active form used in the brain is Methylcobalamin as this form is readily available and known to be the effective form I don't understand(apart from the fact it's cheaper) why the less active Cyanocobalamin form is used.
While Dr Oz may promote the use of shots the evidence remains that oral sprays/sublingual methylcobalamin are cheaper, more effective and the preferred route.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21556950Oral vitamin B12 replacement is an effective and safe treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency in gastric cancer patients after total gastrectomy.
 


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