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Old 08-08-2010, 10:00 AM
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Default Calcium supplementation causes heart attacks!

Getting it wrong all the way down, as usual, conventional doctors are teaching unsuspecting women they can strengthen their bones by taking calcium supplements. Well, after all, osteoporosis is caused by lack of calcium, isnít it?
No!!
Itís a whole body nutritional disease and magnesium is the main deficiency. As I have written in my last 3 books and all over my websites, calcium is not the answer. If it was, answer me this:
Why is it that in China women never get osteoporosis, and they donít include dairy products in their diet; yet American women, with the highest intake of dairy products in the world, also have the highest incidence of osteoporosis?
It doesnít make sense, if calcium was the problem it should be the other way round.
Did you know that, in fact, more women die of fracture of the femur in the US than die of breast cancer?
Yet all you hear is ďtake calcium supplementsĒ. ďTake Fosamax,Ē and all the other deadly bisphosphonate junk.
Calcium is the last thing we need, as I keep saying. Calcium is aging! Calcium deposits mean decay!
Calcium deposits in your coronary arteries is the number one marker we have for risk of heart attack! Calcium deposits in the joints means arthritis! Calcium deposits in the brain mean senility. Hardening of the arteries is lethal and needs to be reversed.
Calcium wonít go into bones selectively; we get it everywhere. The whole thing is preposterously stupidóbut it lives on in the mythology called orthodox medicine.
Now a new paper has backed up everything Iíve been saying for over two decades: calcium supplements are bad news.


An analysis of close to a dozen clinical trials involving about 12,000 patients found calcium supplementation to be associated with a 20% to 30% increase in heart attack risk (but not deaths or strokes). Duh!
The study appears today in the journal BMJ Online First [Bolland, M.J. BMJ Online First, July 30, 2010].
In an editorial published with the study, the researchers write that calcium supplements alone do not prevent fractures and may even slightly increase fracture risk. Duh!
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:07 AM
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I agree athletic dept, I read about that a long time ago! My bottle of calcium is sitting on the shelf getting dusty. I have increased my magnesium and supplement with k2 to control calcium in my arteries. I think with my normal diet, my intake is adequate.
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:41 AM
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There is a previous thread on this same topic here.
Calcium pills 'increase risk of heart attack' claim!
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Old 08-08-2010, 11:14 AM
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Another related discussion here.
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Old 08-08-2010, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by athletic dept View Post
Why is it that in China women never get osteoporosis, and they donít include dairy products in their diet; yet American women, with the highest intake of dairy products in the world, also have the highest incidence of osteoporosis?
It doesnít make sense, if calcium was the problem it should be the other way round.
Here is the reason.

Quote:
Bone mineral density in hyperthyroidism.

Karga H, Papapetrou PD, Korakovouni A, Papandroulaki F, Polymeris A, Pampouras G.
Second Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Alexandra Hospital, Athens, Greece.
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether previous hyperthyroidism is a cause of permanent secondary osteoporosis. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: In this cross-sectional study, 164 women with untreated or previously treated overt and symptomatic hyperthyroidism were examined 0-31 years after the initial episode of hyperthyroidism and its treatment, and were compared with a control group of 79 age-matched women without previous history of hyperthyroidism. Subjects with current or previous metabolic bone disease, any antiresorptive treatment for osteoporosis or treatments and habits known to affect bone metabolism were excluded. MEASUREMENTS: The age of the first manifestation of the disease, the age at the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) at the spine and femoral neck and the interval between diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism and BMD measurement were recorded and the Z-scores and T-scores of BMD were analysed. RESULTS: Untreated hyperthyroidism and hyperthyroidism up to 3 years after its diagnosis and treatment were associated with decreased BMD. Three or more years after the first episode of the disease the mean Z-score at both skeletal sites was near zero and not different from the controls. The age at which hyperthyroidism was manifested for the first time had no effect on the final outcome. Women affected at a young age (13-30 years) had a more pronounced loss of BMD when examined untreated or early (< 3 years) after diagnosis, but a BMD significantly above zero if examined later (> 3 years). Older women (aged 51-70 years) showed a similar pattern, although the differences were not significant. Middle-aged subjects (31-50 years) had the smallest loss of BMD during the first 3 years. Analysis of T-scores of former hyperthyroid women aged > or = 51 years showed no significantly different relative risk (RR) for osteoporosis in comparison with the controls. However, the study was not powered enough to give meaningful RR results. CONCLUSIONS: Overt symptomatic hyperthyroidism is associated with decreased BMD during the first 3 years after diagnosis and treatment of the disease. After this interval, former hyperthyroid women have a Z-score near zero and not different from women without a history of the disease, apparently because of recovery of the bone density lost early during the course of the disease. Symptomatic hyperthyroidism does not seem to be a cause of long-lasting osteoporosis, and the age of the patient during the first episode is irrelevant.

PMID: 15473879 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...?dopt=Abstract
It is due to American women being grossly deficient in iodine. This is most likely due to the iodine phobia of our medical professionals. Bone loss does occur in patients with hyperthyroidism, as that study indicates. It is generally reversible once the hyperthyroidism is treated and thyroid status returns to normal. Iodine can correct both hyper and hypothyrodism.
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Old 08-08-2010, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by athletic dept View Post
Why is it that in China women never get osteoporosis, and they donít include dairy products in their diet; yet American women, with the highest intake of dairy products in the world, also have the highest incidence of osteoporosis?
I don't want to appear pedantic but osteoporosis isn't unknown in China.
The fact it was remarkably lower in the 1960s was mainly because only a small percentage of the population reached 60 or beyond 65.
Now there has been an increase in lifespan more Chinese are getting hip fractures.
Between 1960 and 1990 the hip fracture rate increased 3 fold in Hong Kong and Singapore and they are expecting a similar increase in China as their Diets and Lifestyle become increasingly Westernised.

The risk of hip fracture in people with Diabetes is double that of non diabetics Low vitamin D, low omega 3, too much omega 6, insufficient magnesium and of course iodine are all implicated it's far more complicated than just throwing more calcium at the issue. Doing that is a bit like trying to mend a broken wall by mixing some fresh mortar then throwing that mortar at the heap of bricks..

As said previously
Quote:
Itís a whole body nutritional disease and magnesium is the main deficiency.
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:00 PM
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i just want to point out that calcium doesn't work alone. dumping large amounts of a single nutrient into the body without it's co-factors is only asking for trouble. we must focus on complete nutrition. aside from that, the muscles and skeleton need to be stimulated by exercise to help the process along.
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Old 04-09-2011, 12:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pablo View Post
i just want to point out that calcium doesn't work alone. dumping large amounts of a single nutrient into the body without it's co-factors is only asking for trouble. we must focus on complete nutrition. aside from that, the muscles and skeleton need to be stimulated by exercise to help the process along.
Indeed we do have to consider Vitamin D3 supplemention is association with VITAMIN D'S CO-FACTORS and we need to understand how since the introduction of dwarf wheat varieties in the mid 1960's remember back then there was still a market for Fat-ten-u see comments after blog the magnesium content of flour decreased along with copper & zinc at the same time these new varietes were more pro inflammatory as they contained more celiac disease-related gluten epitopes.
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Old 04-12-2011, 02:57 AM
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Enjoyed reading the posts. I've never been to China, but I've been to Japan multiple times and they really don't have any dairy in their diet. Japan and Okinawa always make the list of people who live the longest in the world and dairy is really missing from their diet completely, especially in Okinawa.

Well here's also a similar finding, but with Japan instead
http://www.betterbones.com/osteoporo...eoporosis.aspx
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Old 04-12-2011, 03:36 AM
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Originally Posted by jbo View Post
Enjoyed reading the posts. I've never been to China, but I've been to Japan multiple times and they really don't have any dairy in their diet. Japan and Okinawa always make the list of people who live the longest in the world and dairy is really missing from their diet completely, especially in Okinawa.

Well here's also a similar finding, but with Japan instead
http://www.betterbones.com/osteoporo...eoporosis.aspx
Nice site. I agree that we really should be reducing the emphasis on calcium and thinking about why our bones are not as strong as they should be. We have to understand better how a deficiency in one mineral, such as magnesium can lead to higher levels of iron which leads to increasing oxidative damage to our organs, so correcting magnesium status is an overlooked priority, I think most people have grasped that getting vitamin D above 40ng/ml 1000nmol/l is needed now and that when that is done sufficient calcium will be absorbed from the diet without supplements, but because of the way we now breed new wheat varieties, and fertilize them see this video explaining Magnesium one of the reasons why we are deficient
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:07 AM
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Ted has tied it together rather nicely. Lack of any of the above really can result in a cascade of negative events. It is not so much a lack of Calcium as it is the inability to make use of what Calcium we have available.

In regards to Osteoporosis bone needs to be stressed to grow in strength. One of the big challenges in space exploration in zero gravity is how to prevent bone loss, when there is little stress on the bones.

You need to be active, especially as you get older to prevent Osteoporosis.
Bone only grows as strong as it needs to be for everyday activity.

As far as I know Jack La Lanne never broke a hip, in spite of his age.

Dan
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