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Old 08-05-2010, 06:02 PM
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Default Vitamin C Oxidizes Iodine

Hulda Clark recommends that if you spill iodine on your clothes or carpet to take some ascorbic acid and apply it. The iodine will soon disappear.

So does this not make is a wise decision to take your iodine in the am and your vitiamin C in the pm or visa versa?

The other day I was washing a bottle top that was stained from black tea that could not be washed off. I remembered what Dr Clark said about vitamin C and its oxidizing properties. I opened a cap of plain ascorbic acid and poured it on the wet bottle cap.

In about 3 minutes all the tea stains were gone. This sure is making me think different about when and with what I take my vitamin c.
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Old 08-05-2010, 06:50 PM
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Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant. Iodine is an oxidant. Ascorbic acid is a very powerful antioxidant - when it is stable. In college chemistry, there is a test for the power of ascorbic acid in this reaction. Iodine will be converted to iodide, when ascorbic acid is added. It will become transparent, but will remain iodide.

This is what I've been saying here regarding multivitamins. It does not seem to me that multivitamins are worth the money. Not when they contain both iodine and vitamin C. Not when they contain both calcium and magnesium. Other incompatible elements as well.

Yet, an excellent natural and healthy food contains mixtures that are seemingly incompatible. Seaweed. It contains iodine and mercury together. Iodine will chelate mercury. Iodine oxidizes mercury to render it unusable by the body.

This is a problem which I've had for very many years. What is the right formula for whatever ails me. Not only do I need a good diagnostician, but also a good herbologist or naturopathic doctor. I know what herbs do, but one must know which herbs work the best together for the condition. It matters.
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Old 08-06-2010, 05:11 AM
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Things that should not be taken together:

1) Vit E and Iron
2) Vit C and B-12
3) Vit C and selenium
4) Any mineral and dark green leafy vegetables
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Old 08-30-2010, 01:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saved1986 View Post
Things that should not be taken together:

1) Vit E and Iron
2) Vit C and B-12
3) Vit C and selenium
4) Any mineral and dark green leafy vegetables

Why do you say this? Don't green leafy vegs. contain minerals as I have read?, if so then what is the difference?... Just trying to understand.

This is confusing...I think I have seen just about every vitamin/mineral combination that should/should not be taken with something else,...as pointed out above there are combinations in nature that I have read people saying we should not combine so does anyone really know?
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Old 08-30-2010, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by cyber-junkie View Post
Why do you say this? Don't green leafy vegs. contain minerals as I have read?, if so then what is the difference?... Just trying to understand.

This is confusing...I think I have seen just about every vitamin/mineral combination that should/should not be taken with something else,...as pointed out above there are combinations in nature that I have read people saying we should not combine so does anyone really know?
Combination of vitamins and minerals are different and managed very well in nature than in multivitamins with recommended daily requirements. For example, seaweed (kelp) contains iodine and mercury. Iodine chelates mercury, rendering it useless to the body. There will still be iodine left over, from this process, to be helpful to your body. It is the amount that matters more.

Saved1986 left out another combination that should be avoided. Such as magnesium and calcium. Magnesium is a calcium channel blocker. Meaning that calcium would be useless in this combination.
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Old 08-30-2010, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyber-junkie View Post
Why do you say this? Don't green leafy vegs. contain minerals as I have read?, if so then what is the difference?... Just trying to understand.

This is confusing...I think I have seen just about every vitamin/mineral combination that should/should not be taken with something else,...as pointed out above there are combinations in nature that I have read people saying we should not combine so does anyone really know?

1) Vit E and Iron IRON DEACTIVATES IN THE STOMACH
2) Vit C and B-12 LARGE CONCENTRATIONS OF VITAMIN C DESTROY b-12
3) Vit C and selenium VITAMIN C DEACTIVATES SELENIUM IN THE STOMACH WHEN VIT C IS TAKEN IN OVER 100 MG DOSES
4) Any mineral and dark green leafy vegetables SOME DARK LEAFY VEGGIES CONTAIN OXALATES WHICH BIND TO MINERALS
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Old 08-30-2010, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by jfh View Post
Combination of vitamins and minerals are different and managed very well in nature than in multivitamins with recommended daily requirements. For example, seaweed (kelp) contains iodine and mercury. Iodine chelates mercury, rendering it useless to the body. There will still be iodine left over, from this process, to be helpful to your body. It is the amount that matters more.

Saved1986 left out another combination that should be avoided. Such as magnesium and calcium. Magnesium is a calcium channel blocker. Meaning that calcium would be useless in this combination.
OK another one...Dolomite is natural calcium and magnesium, so if taken the calcium is not absorbed?
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Old 08-30-2010, 06:14 PM
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OK another one...Dolomite is natural calcium and magnesium, so if taken the calcium is not absorbed?
Correct. Magnesium will block it.

Natural calcium? Calcium is an element. It can exist ionic, but it is still an element. Even if its source is organic, such as milk or shell, it is an element. Magnesium is a calcium channel blocker. Your body can still use the calcium in several other ways, but magnesium blocks it from your heart.

Calcium channel blocker drugs work to lower blood pressure by blocking the entry of calcium into heart cells and smooth muscle cells of blood vessels. Magnesium has protective features that balance out the negative effects of calcium overload on the heart. It blocks the entry of calcium into heart cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, reducing vascular resistance and naturally lowering blood pressure. Both minerals need to be present for the body to absorb them properly.

So, for best benefit, take calcium in the morning and magnesium at night. Magnesium will relax the artery muscles, will help to calm you, and will help to prevent leg cramps (charlie horse).
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Old 08-30-2010, 08:51 PM
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I never understood what a "blocker" is, so it refers to the heart?

One alternative health doctor put me on coral calcium to "lower" my ph and within a few days I developed heart palpitations, the calcium was the only thing new I was doing so I stopped and within several days they got better and adding extra vitamin c they have almost stopped...so maybe being a calcium blocker for me would be good as I am kinda weary of calcium supplements.
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Old 08-30-2010, 08:56 PM
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Instead, you may want to take both minerals together. However, there should be a balance.

The National Academy of Sciences recommends a bare minimum of 1,000 milligrams per day of calcium, although because of limited absorption, twice as much can be taken. The recommended daily amount of magnesium is around 400 milligrams. For equilibrium, the body needs a ratio of 2:1 of calcium to magnesium.
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:03 PM
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One thought is that Calcium is recommended at 2x the magnesium, so if you took them together at that ratio, would you still have excess calcium to be used? Also magnesium passes the blood brain barrier. Does calcium? Maybe the mg gets filtered out.

Also iodine and mercury- does that mean the iodine is not available if bound to the mercury? If so then how much is iodine is left over? Iodoral is 12.5mg based on kelp consumption by Japanese women. But maybe they don't really get that much?
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Old 08-31-2010, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfh View Post
Instead, you may want to take both minerals together. However, there should be a balance.

The National Academy of Sciences recommends a bare minimum of 1,000 milligrams per day of calcium, although because of limited absorption, twice as much can be taken. The recommended daily amount of magnesium is around 400 milligrams. For equilibrium, the body needs a ratio of 2:1 of calcium to magnesium.
I know from personal experience the calcium did not sit well with my body but magnesium does and have read on other sites and a few places that we are magnesium deficient in relation to calcium, so maybe for people like myself with heart issues it might be better to take them together, actually what I have read seems to suggest that if you supplement and eat a fairly healthy diet that you get a fair amount of calcium but not magnesium, and DR. Leavy's book "Stop America's no. one killer" on heart disease does not recommend calcium and after putting this all together for myself I emailed him and he responded with...No, do not take calcium if you have heart issues, and he stated he was working on another book that will be titled something like "death by calcium".
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Old 08-31-2010, 12:12 PM
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That is true cyber-junkie. You probably get enough of your calcium from your diet. We are all mostly deficient in magnesium and iodine and probably many others.
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Old 09-05-2010, 12:01 PM
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I have read it's best to take iodine on an empty stomach, so how long after can you take other supplements (an antioxidant) or food?
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Old 09-05-2010, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
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I have read it's best to take iodine on an empty stomach, so how long after can you take other supplements (an antioxidant) or food?
That is only if you are on some sort of iodine therapy protocol. Otherwise, iodine exists in many food sources. Iodine is a mineral, and should not necessarily be taken on an empty stomach. Iodine may not, but many minerals can make you nauseated on an empty stomach, zinc for example. You can even add drops of Lugol's iodine to food as you cook it. As a therapy, you would want to take it on an empty stomach to avoid vitamin c and selenium being taken (in food) at the same time. While using iodine as therapy, you should supplement with selenium, vitamin C, and magnesium, but not at the same time as iodine.
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