Toxic clothing

Living Food

New member
Joined
Sep 19, 2012
Location
USA
The evils of synthetic clothing

Synthetic clothing is full of highly toxic chemicals such as VOCs, PFCs (the same carcinogen that saturate the air you breathe every time you heat up a nonstick pan), flame retardants, formaldehyde, and many more. Studies have found that these chemicals are present in nearly everyone alive today, and they have been linked to cancer, thyroid problems, brain damage, infertility, and most of the debilitating chronic diseases that are so common today. A total of over 8,000 chemicals are used in clothing manufacturing, and the vast majority are harmful to your health.*

The hundreds of toxins from synthetic clothing enter the body through the pores, and some of them are given off as toxic gases that are inhaled (you don't want to be in a small room filled with people wearing synthetic clothes). When it's hot and humid out the pores open wide and you're treated to a nice dose of carcinogens, and I imagine that heat also causes the chemicals from the clothing to be released faster. To make things even worse, many synthetic fibers also "suffocate" the skin and prevent the elimination of toxins through the skin (placing a much greater burden on your other organs of elimination, which are mostly likely already overloaded considering the world we live in).

Even natural fiber clothing hampers the skin's ability to eliminate toxins, but not to the degree that synthetic clothing does. But it's still better to wear as little clothing as possible and take "air baths" (ie go naked) whenever you're alone.




Synthetic clothing and energy flow


There is abundant scientific evidence to back up everything I said above. Understandably less so for this part of the subject, but that does not make it any less true.

Energy is constantly flowing through and around the body. Everyone has an electromagnetic body superimposed over their physical one. This is frequently called the aura, and it extends beyond the limits of the physical body. Synthetic clothing and plastics block the flow of energy through the physical body and the aura and so contribute to energy blockages and disease.




Tight clothing must be avoided

All clothing has a slight effect on blood and lymph circulation, but the tighter the clothing the greater the harm. Tight bras significantly increase your chance of getting breast cancer because they suppress the lymphatic system and to a lesser degree blood flow. They can also put excess strain on the shoulders, back and neck. Tight clothing anywhere on the body will restrict blood flow to that area and sometimes pinch important nerves, but the specific effects will be different depending on which part of the body is being inhibited. Clothing that presses into the abdomen, for example, inhibits digestion. Too-tight collars or ties can exert undue pressure on the jugular and/or carotoid artery, causing glaucoma and lack of blood flow to the brain, respectively. The list is endless.



Our skin is meant to be exposed to the sun and the wind. There is an abundance of information on the benefits of sun exposure and vitamin D (despite the laughable attempts to get us to believe the sun is dangerous), but the influence of free air flow and wind exposure has gotten much less attention. The skin is constantly perspiring and eliminating toxins, and when you're wearing clothing of any kind, or else in an area where the air is stagnant (ie indoors), the toxins are trapped and are reabsorbed into your bloodstream. But when there is a breeze and good air flow they are wicked away before they can cause anymore damage. A cool breeze also has a tonic effect on your whole system, and I suspect that the wind has other health benefits too by stimulating the nerve endings on your skin (which can only happen when you expose your bare skin). The wind going through the trees and near running water also produces numerous health-enhancing negative ions. While it is good to charge your clothing with them, the benefit would be even greater if they were to come into contact with your bare skin.
 

Living Food

New member
Joined
Sep 19, 2012
Location
USA
Original Poster
You should always line-dry your clothing outside instead of using a dryer. Dryers produce massive amounts of inflammation-promoting positive ions (very damaging to health), whereas line-drying the clothes charges it with negative ions.
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA
The evils of synthetic clothing

flame retardants, formaldehyde, and many more. Studies have found that these chemicals are present in nearly everyone alive today, and they have been linked to cancer, thyroid problems, brain damage, infertility, and most of the debilitating chronic diseases that are so common today. A total of over 8,000 chemicals are used in clothing manufacturing, and the vast majority are harmful to your health.*
Bromine, in mattresses, bedding, kids PJ's, etc. :yuck:
 

saved1986

In seaerch of spicy food
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
As a chemist, I prefer cotton. If you wear polyester and a hot surface or flame touches it, it melts to your body, cotton just burns off
 

happy2bhere

Observing cool stuff
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Location
INternets
What about that genetically modified cotton that is being grown? What type of off gassing does THAT produce once it is clothing/bedding, I wonder??:yuck::yuck: I have heard that gmo foods continually produce pesticides while inside your gut. Well, is pesticide being made while you are sleeping on the Monsanto devil worship cloth?

Bt cotton cultivation in many countries

GM cotton has become widespread, covering a total of 15 million hectares in 2007, or 43 percent of the world's cotton. Most GM cotton is grown in India and the US, but it can also be found in China, Argentina, South Africa, Australia, Mexico, and Columbia. The GM cultivars grown today are resistant to herbicides orinsect pests.

More than half (68%) of China's cotton production is genetically modified to produce a substance (Bt toxin) that protects it against insect pests. A few types of caterpillars are especially problematic because they bore into cotton bolls reducing yield and compromising quality. Cotton used to be protected from insects by repeated pesticide applications. Bt cotton has now enabled Chinese farmers to dramatically reduce pesticide use.http://www.gmo-compass.org/eng/grocery_shopping/crops/161.genetically_modified_cotton.html
This crap has been around since 1997? Huh?
Bt cotton - the facts behind the hype

GRAIN | 18 January 2007 | Seedling - January 2007

GRAIN
It has been over ten years now since genetically modified Bt cotton was first commercialised. Since then it has been introduced or tested in more than twenty countries. The crop is a clear success for Monsanto, the leading Bt cotton company. But what has it meant for farmers? Today, a more complete picture is finally emerging of what is happening on the farm in many countries throughout the world.
At the beginning of November 2006, Burkina Faso’s national agricultural research institute invited a group of journalists, scientists and farmers to a Bt cotton test site in the town of Boni. They were shown two small parcels of land on a farm belonging to SOFITEX, the country’s largest cotton company. One was planted with genetically modified Bt cotton and the other with a conventional variety. It wasn’t hard to see the difference: the Bt cotton field had better yields and had sustained less damage from pests, even though, according to the researchers, the Bt cotton had been sprayed only twice with pesticides, while the conventional crop had been sprayed six times.
The display was enough to convince many of the visiting farmers. “I believe that we can now go ahead with the cultivation of GM cotton, given the results of the experiments in Boni,” said Sessouma Amadou, a cotton farmer from the region of Kénédougou. “Now my concern is only with how to acquire the seeds and how to get them at a good price.” The early results from the small field trials were also proof enough for Burkina’s government, which took the opportunity to tell the press that it intended to push forward with the commercialisation of Bt cotton for the following season, two years before its biosafety research was scheduled for completion. [1]http://www.grain.org/article/entries/582-bt-cotton-the-facts-behind-the-hype
 

mommysunshine

New member
Joined
Oct 23, 2010
Location
Sunny, tropical, CA.
Good information Living Foods. We need to be aware of everything that impacts us.

I love cotton, too. Whole Foods sells organic clothing. I purchased a couple t-shirts for $10 each. Not bad.

Polyester. I use to wear my leggings from the gym all the time ( I have 6 pairs) and they are a mixed blend of synthetic fabrics. I had a bioscan done and the machine picked up that I was toxic with polyester. Oh man! My pants caused this. Needless to say, they sit in my closet unused.
 

Thrasymachus

New member
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Location
Dover, NJ
Do you have a more authentic or authoritative source? I try to only wear polyester breathable and quick drying shirts. I hear that cotton is heavily chemically processed.

I found this article alot time ago lamenting that people use too much laundry detergent:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/13/your-money/13shortcuts.html
The arcile say people use so much, you may have to run your bath towels through eight times to remove all the soap residue from chronically using too much detergent.
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA

mommysunshine

New member
Joined
Oct 23, 2010
Location
Sunny, tropical, CA.
Do you have a more authentic or authoritative source? I try to only wear polyester breathable and quick drying shirts. I hear that cotton is heavily chemically processed.
This is my experience. I didn't find the information from research.

The safest thing is just to walk around naked like Living Food suggested but since we may get in legal trouble over that there's no harm done to sleep that way.
 


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