The Inflammatory Model of Tooth Decay, or Why Weston Price is Correct

Ted_Hutchinson

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May 25, 2009

mommysunshine

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Oct 23, 2010
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I'm so interested in this Ted. Thanks for all the links. Those smiles from indigenous people that Dr. Price photographed are gorgeous and to think their teeth were nearly tooth decay free? Oh, I'm jealous!
 

Arrowwind09

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Oct 16, 2007
Please dont think that a lack of tooth decay will indicate perfect health for everyone, It is only a part of the story.
 

u&iraok

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May 22, 2009
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Please dont think that a lack of tooth decay will indicate perfect health for everyone, It is only a part of the story.
Ain't that the truth? I inherited really good teeth from my healthy mother, but I inherited a lot of bad stuff from my father's unhealthy side of the family, just not his really bad teeth. I had perfect straight teeth as well, until I let all my perfectly fine wisdom teeth grow in. Now I have a little crowding but I have a narrow face and jaw. I know it's partly my good diet, but I can skip the dentist for years because I don't even need cleanings. I go every 2 years just to be safe.

I know part of Weston Price's observations was that healthy groups of people also had wider faces so that their teeth were straight. He said that poor health manifested itself in narrow faces and jaws that couldn't support the teeth well.
 

mommysunshine

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Please dont think that a lack of tooth decay will indicate perfect health for everyone, It is only a part of the story.
I do think those who don't have a bacterial load that originates in the gum and teeth are very fortunate because the immune system doesn't have the extra burden of fighting a losing battle. I suppose no body is without it's load of burden somewhere in the body....teeth, colon, stomach, brain or all the above.
 

Arrowwind09

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Oct 16, 2007
I do think those who don't have a bacterial load that originates in the gum and teeth are very fortunate because the immune system doesn't have the extra burden of fighting a losing battle. I suppose no body is without it's load of burden somewhere in the body....teeth, colon, stomach, brain or all the above.
true, and u&iraok, I had to have my wisdom teeth pulled because I didn't have room for them.

Crooked teeth are also harder to keep clean and I suspect more prone to lending to gum infections.

Same with the Egyptians,,, they developed lots of disease when agriculture got developed.
 


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