The Art of making Colloidal Silver

abeland1

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Jan 2, 2018
There are three factors that will determine the quality of the colloidal silver that you make. The first is the water that you use. It must be distilled to a high degree of purity. You will need some way to check that the water you are using is pure enough. The distilled water that is sold in grocery stores in 1-gallon containers will generally be good enough. You will still need some way to check it. That can be done with a conductivity meter or by some method included in the design and function of whatever generator we use.

The second factor is the purity of the silver that we use. We want silver ions and preferably no other metals. We want to make a solution containing silver ions, as they are proven to be of great benefit. There are many other metals. However, that can do us great harm. We must take every precaution we can to avoid taking toxic metals into our bodies. That is why we use only 9999 silver wire and insist on a certificate of analysis showing the impurities that are present. In the case of the highest quality silver, the largest impurity will be copper which is not bad in small amounts. That will be the case in silver that comes directly from silver ore that is refined directly. If you buy silver without an assay certificate, it could contain scraps from manufacturing facilities that are alloying silver with any number of other metals. So it's not just a matter of it being 9999, but what is the nature of the other .01%. When you consider the fact that when we make colloidal silver, the result is a liquid solution with silver in parts per million (PPM), it makes no sense to try to economize on this. If we consider making colloidal silver at a strength of 10 PPM, for example, 1 ounce of silver wire could make theoretically 100,000 ounces or 1500 gallons of colloidal silver.

The third factor is the amount of time that we allow the process. Hydrogen will appear at the cathode (the negatively charged electrode, where electrons enter the water), and oxygen will appear at the anode (the positively charged electrode). Back in the days of the 3 9 V battery and coins, we would wait until we saw a cloud of what we were told were pieces of silver forming in the water and stopping the process soon after that. In reality, the cloud formed by hydrogen and oxygen micro bubbles and meant that the process was in a runaway mode. Disconnecting the batteries at that point would, if you were lucky, get you perhaps a five PPM colloidal silver solution. It would not keep its strength for very long as the larger particles would quickly collide with and absorb the silver ions. A few of us promoted the use of current limiting to prevent the runaway condition. Some of us noted that the higher resistance we used, the better results we obtained in both higher PPM and stability. Many of us, including yours truly, tried every conceivable method of stirring to allow the use of a higher current to speed up the process. All of my efforts in this direction failed. I could not get around the fact that for a given surface area of silver anode only a certain amount of current was allowed. There is a region surrounding the anode called the Nernst diffusion area. To put it simply, it is a region that will only allow a certain density of ions to exist before they agglomerate into larger particles. So for those of you with your setups for making colloidal silver, try reducing the current and allowing more time and let us know the results.
 

abeland1

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Another item that you will find useful is a quality laser pointer. Nothing from China. High-quality laser pointers have a current regulating circuit which ensures that the output of the laser remains the same no matter what the condition of the batteries. The rated power is maintained until there is no laser action whatsoever, at which time the batteries have to be replaced. The cheap ones from China will vary in power, therefore making a very poor test instrument. The laser pointer will enable you to see the generation of the small particles, as they are being made. This will occur after you have achieved the highest possible ionic portion, the ions are combining to form larger particles. In the days before we had laser pointers to use, we did not know whether or not we had made colloidal silver until a yellow hue appeared. The yellow hue was caused by the presence of particles larger than of 40 nm in size. It creates a yellow because the particles block the blue part of the spectrum. If you subtract blue from the rest of the spectrum, you have a red green that you see as yellow. The smaller particles are more desirable as they have more surface area.
 

abeland1

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Re: Colloidal Silver Beats Coronavirus: the Clinical Documentation
Journal of Applied MicrobiologyVolume 123, Issue 5
Here is an authoritative review documenting the effectiveness of silver. There is all the evidence that is needed here and none of it can be characterized as "anecdotal.":

[link to pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (secure)]

Of particular interest at this time would be the information of action against viruses:
"Antiviral activity of natural mineral silver in a variety of forms including colloidal silver has been demonstrated through nearly three decades of medical research (Fig. 2). It has been reported that silver can stop different types of viruses from replicating by merely binding to them. Recent research demonstrates that silver is so powerfully effective against viruses that it even stops the deadly HIV virus from infecting human cells. The vital requirement in order to exhibit such powerful antiviral activity is the size of the silver particles. Nanoparticles of size ranging from 1 to 100 nm are efficient as smaller size leads to more interaction and inhibition of viruses (Galdiero et al. 2011; Khandelwal et al. 2014). Silver nanoparticles undergo a size‐dependent interaction with HIV‐1 virus and nanoparticles in the size range of 1–10 nm were able to attach to the virus. The interaction is via preferential binding of AgNPs to the gp120 glycoprotein knobs which bear the exposed sulfur residues and inhibit the virus from binding to host cells in vitro (Elechiguerra et al. 2005)."
Careful reading will reveal that our quest to maximize the ionic portion of what we make has been the correct approach.

[link to theartofmakingcolloidalsilver.com (secure)]
abeland1
The Art of making Colloidal Silver


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01/12/2022 09:23 AM


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abeland1

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Silver has been associated with human medicine and healthcare for over two millennia. The ‘father of modern medicine,’ Hippocrates, wrote using silver to improve wound care around 400 BC. During the intervening years, silver has featured in a wide range of writings, most of which highlight its capabilities, particularly limiting inflammation and infection. The interest in silver in medicine was probably spurred by long‐held knowledge that silver kept many perishable items fresh for more extended periods – for example, silver coins were often dropped into barrels of water and milk on long journeys to slow their degradation. While it was not understood at the time, silver ions are formed under these conditions, which interrupt many microbial processes associated with spoilage. It is this relatively simple piece of science that ultimately drove the medical community’s interest in silver.
One example of this type of research is work undertaken at North Carolina State University under Assistant Professor Rohan Shirwaiker. His team has been developing an electrically‐activated silver‐based antimicrobial implant system. They have engineered the application of low-intensity direct and alternating current mechanisms to a silver‐titanium implant system to release silver ions that kill or neutralize bacteria on and around the implant. A small power circuitry that can be integrated into the implant design creates a potential difference between the implant’s silver and titanium components. The conductive body fluids surrounding the device result in a small electrical current via the release of antimicrobial silver ions. Such a system can be utilized in implants for prevention or the treatment of device‐associated infection. With the growing number of implant procedures, including total hip and knee joint arthroplasties, such innovations in silver-based antimicrobial technology can significantly improve patient outcomes while reducing medical expenditure. They indicate negligible toxicity. Modern-day medical uses of silver began at the turn of the 19th century when surgeons used silver sutures to help minimize post‐operative inflammation. Later in the 1800s, silver nitrate eyedrops were introduced as an antiseptic (to reduce neonatal conjunctivitis). The following century saw World War I soldiers take silver leaf into battle to help fight infection if they were injured in the trenches. Silver was increasingly used to treat everyday ailments such as sore throats and tonsillitis. This increase in usage was accompanied by the identification of argyria, a rare condition associated with the gradual accumulation of silver compounds in the body and characterized by discoloration of the skin in the most extreme cases.

Alexander Fleming’s discovery of antibiotics in the late 1920s saw a reduction of interest in silver’s use in medicine for a short period, but this was reignited in the 1960s by the work of Professor Carl Moyer, who was Chairman of the Department of Surgery, Washington University, Missouri. Moyer recognized the potential of silver salts to be used in the treatment of severe burns injuries. In a paper presented at the 69th annual convention of the U.S. National Medical Association in 1964, Moyer described: “A personal experience during 25 years with applying dressings continuously wet with 0.5% silver nitrate to chronically infected open wounds and to thin split‐grafts on surfaces that rejected them repeatedly, had demonstrated that silver nitrate in this concentration cleared the ulcers of organisms such as pseudomonas, staphylococci, streptococci and proteus quickly, and that small stamp‐type skin grafts would take and proliferate rapidly when covered continuously with 0.5% silver nitrate.
 

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