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Sun Screen!

EarlyBird

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
I haven't been a Sun worshiper for years :(
only getting my Vit D in very short spurts.
However, I have an opportunity to visit a
swimming pool this summer, and
need some advice. :D Is there such a thing as a
Natural Sun Screen?
 

TexasShabbyChic

New member
Joined
Apr 14, 2006
Location
Beautiful Austin,Tx
Hello EB, I have not ordered it yet, but Mercola offers what "appears" to be a good/natural sunscreen. Maybe someone out there has tried it.

I have ordered the mosquito repellent but have not had the chance to try it. good luck.
 

Mike

New member
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
sunblock

To protect from burns, this is the safest sunblock I have found: http://www.aubrey-organics.com/product1.cfm?product_id=251

Although this is the "safest" I have found, there is some concern about a PABA derivitive in it:

"In March 1998, Dr. John Knowland of the University of Oxford reported studies showing that certain sunscreens containing PABA and its derivatives can damage DNA, at least in the test tube experiments. When a chemical sunscreen, Padimate-O, was added to DNA and the mixture exposed to the ultraviolet rays of sunlight, it was found that the sunscreen broke down in sunlight, releasing highly active agents that could damage DNA. It did not block out the UV, but instead absorbed energy. “It became excited and set off a chemical reaction that resulted in the generation of the dangerous free radicals and broken DNA strands that can lead to cancer,” he said and further commented that while it's too early to make blanket recommendations, “I would not use a product containing PABA, Padimate-O or other PABA derivatives.”  Dr.  Martin  Rieger  reported that PABA may play a role in DNA-dimer formation, a type of DNA damage that can induce carcinogenic changes."
Mike
 

bifrost99

Beloved Mentor
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
I never tried it, but I read that one of the "side" benefits of the Budwig "diet" (flaxseed oil and quark) is quick recovery, if not prevention of, sunburn.

I would suspect it's the EFAs, but why not take the protein as well?

This approach (eating something) may be a lot better than just rubbing something on.

Gerry
 

EarlyBird

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
Original Poster
Sun Screen!

Thanks Everyone for your comments/advice. I'll check out Marcola for one.

Gerry, maybe I'll just rub some flax oil on my skin - I can't seem to be able to drink it or use it on salads. :lol:

I use the flax meal instead, for my Omega 3's.
 

bifrost99

Beloved Mentor
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
EarlyBird said:
Gerry, maybe I'll just rub some flax oil on my skin - I can't seem to be able to drink it or use it on salads. :lol:
I don't know if it would work that way. But you could try. :wink:

I use the flax meal instead, for my Omega 3's.
No reason why this should not work. Me, I don't really believe in the necessity of using flax oil for EFAs. I would prefer cod liver oil or fish oil, and would definitely prefer enjoying the fish instead of just the oil. :lol:

Gerry
 

Harry Hirsute

New member
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Location
Propecia, CA
remember!

Just a friendly reminder that you can produce an internal sunscreen by consuming lot's of antioxidant-rich foods in your diet - and/or take them by way of supplementation.

Focus on foods that contain a broad spectrum of carotenoids: Wild Salmon (astaxanthin), cooked tomatoe products (lycopene), dark green leafy veggies (lutein), etc.

Also, white and green tea may be a good internal skin protectant (use organic teas or supplements if possible). Add a dash of pomegranate juice and/or blueberry juice for flavor ... both are also very good for the skin!

This is just the tip of the glacier. Eat well. Be sun smart (don't bake). And enjoy!

Be well,

HH
 

EarlyBird

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
Original Poster
Sun

Thanks Harry,Ii'm not much of a Sun Worshipper. so
am not planning on lengthly stays. It's just that I do better
when there's a pool I can cool off in.

I'm still considering using up that last bottle of Flax Oil
I wasted money on. :oops:

I do already consume the foods you mentioned in fairly
large amounts. I ate a huge tomato for dinner last nite
w/some tuna salad on baby spinich and parsley.
No bread or crackers or chips. I'm serious about following
Dr. West's advice on food combinings. Salmon Patties
on the menu tonite with barely steamed zuc. and yellow squash
and onions.
 

Sharon

New member
Joined
Apr 11, 2006
My son started working on a farm this summer. This evening he mentioned that he is the only one of the workers not using sun screen and he's also the only one not getting sunburned.

Could the fact that we use only good fats in our diet make that much difference? We use coconut oil, olive oil, or butter - real, homemade butter.
Oh yes and we supplement fish oil too.

Or is there another connection here that I'm missing?
 

EarlyBird

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
Original Poster
Raw or Cooked Tomatoes

This time of year, when I can get the homegrown fresh tomatoes, I prefer to use lots of those. :D

However, Just Me, supposedly, the Lycopine is more highly enhanced when tomatoes are made into tomato sauce or paste or cooked. I just don't fix as many cooked dishes using tomatoes or tomato sauces in this hot weather.

I did fix some fresh okra and tomatoes a few days ago - one of my favorites.
 

Jack Pine Savage

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Location
North Woods
Just remember.....your skin is the largest organ in your
body. It will absorb drugs and circulate them just like
taking them internally. (think nicotine patches)

Whatever you slather on your skin is taken up internally
and your liver and kidneys have to deal with it (them).

Read labels of anything you rub on your skin and be
forwarned! Use your head. This includes any and all
cosmetics used by women and men.

It's an overlooked area that can be the reason for many
"mysterious" illnesses' that are hard to diagnose.

My son, just left our house and said he had a lousy night,
last night. When we discussed this, he said that this
morning, he felt like he had a giant hang-over. He said
that he did not drink yesterday, and the only thing he can
remember that was different, was that he used a large
amount of sun-block yesterday, because he had to work
outdoors.

I know the FDA approves any topical chemical, (drug?)
but I always wonder about the efficacy of the test
procedures here.

I'm cautious here.
 

RubyTuesday

New member
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
It will absorb drugs and circulate them just like taking them internally. (think nicotine patches)
Well, not "just like..."

http://www.pharm.unito.it/itcrs/erasmus/erasm16.html

Essentially the transport of drugs across skin is a diffusion process, diffusion experiments through skin leading to the determination of drugs permeability coefficient (Papp) from which the diffusion coefficient(D) may be determined since Papp=D.K/h where K is the partition coefficient and h is the skin thickness. Systematic studies have led to compilations of permeability data for a range of drugs through skin, both Stratum corneum and dermis. These studies have highlighted the stratum corneum as the major barrier to drug transport, the relative importance of partition and diffusion in transport processes, the large inter subject variability and slowness of the process for most drugs. Consequently it is not surprising that only a few drug candidates are currently available in dosage forms for transdermal drug delivery. Analysis of the detailed chemical composition and structure of skin are consistent with its high impermeability to many drugs, and also offers insights into approaches to enhancing/improving drug delivery. The debate on the existence of an aqueous pore route through skin will also be discussed. Finally, the range of factors identified as influencing percutaneous absorption will be reviewed as well as formulation approaches to enhancing drug delivery by this route.
 


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