Slight Ache - Kidneys?

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
I've been noticing a slight ache in my back for the last week or so, nothing bad or constant. First I assumed it was a muscle strain, but really haven't done anything out of the ordinary.

I remember Saved1986 mentioning parsley for kidneys (and carrot juice). Well, I already had some organic carrot juice at home, but went out today and bought two supplements to take. I could get fresh parsley, but I don't have a juicer, and would like something easier.

I bought Solaray brand Total Cleanse for kidneys. It has parsley, horsetail, dandelion, nettle, uva ursi, asparagus, celery, green tea, buchu, queen of the meadow, juniper berries, peppermint leaf, ginger root and grapefruit bioflavonoids.

Along with this I plan to take Solaray brand parsley, 860mg per 2 cap serving. Probably do both of these twice a day, and leave my chlorella and some other things alone. Also started drinking a glass of warm water with organic lemon juice twice a day, starting today.

I've been using baking soda for heartburn, and I'm wondering if too much sodium from that is affecting my kidneys (if that's what it is). Never had any kidney issues in the past.
 

Dragon Lady

New member
Joined
Mar 13, 2013
Location
Virginia Beach
Are getting a blood and urine tests a possibility for you? It can be expensive if your insurance doesnt cover it.

The tests could rule IN/OUT kidney stones, infection, renal issues..
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
Be aware of your calcium intake. Things might have changed with the absorption of calcium in your body too. That can happen with higher vitamin D dosages.

If parsley corrects for calcium balance, it is because of this quote.

Parsley is among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health problems. For this reason, individuals with already existing and untreated kidney or gallbladder problems may want to avoid eating parsley. Laboratory studies have shown that oxalates may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body. Yet, in every peer-reviewed research study we've seen, the ability of oxalates to lower calcium absorption is relatively small and definitely does not outweigh the ability of oxalate-containing foods to contribute calcium to the meal plan. If your digestive tract is healthy, and you do a good job of chewing and relaxing while you enjoy your meals, you will get significant benefitséincluding absorption of calcium from calcium-rich foods plant foods that also contain oxalic acid. Ordinarily, a healthcare practitioner would not discourage a person focused on ensuring that they are meeting their calcium requirements from eating these nutrient-rich foods because of their oxalate content. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=100
Here are other foods that contain oxalates.

The following are some examples of the most common sources of oxalates, arranged by food group. It is important to note that the leaves of a plant almost always contain higher oxalate levels than the roots, stems, and stalks.

  • Fruits
    • blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, currants, kiwifruit, concord (purple) grapes, figs, tangerines, and plums
  • Vegetables (see Table 1 for additional information)
    • spinach, Swiss chard, beet greens, collards, okra, parsley, leeks and quinoa are among the most oxalate-dense vegetables
    • celery, green beans, rutabagas, and summer squash would be considered moderately dense in oxalates
  • Nuts and seeds
    • almonds, cashews, and peanuts
  • Legumes
    • soybeans, tofu and other soy products
  • Grains
    • wheat bran, wheat germ, quinoa (a vegetable often used like a grain)
  • Other
    • cocoa, chocolate, and black tea
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=48
Just be aware of your calcium intake. It might be too much. You may also have caused an imbalance between calcium and magnesium. Which as you know could cause other problems such as muscle cramps and possibly higher blood pressure.
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Original Poster
Dragon Lady, thanks for your reply. I do have insurance and can go to the doctor for tests, but I try to avoid doctors if I can. If I can treat it at home and it subsides, then all is good. If conditions worsen, I will definitely consider seeing the doc.

Jfh, thanks for your advice and information, much appreciated. I have used 1,000-4,000 mg of vitamin D3 for years now, since recommended by folks on the forum.

I've been having the heartburn issues for awhile now, and D-Limonene, aloe vera, apple cider vinegar hasn't made a difference. I was thinking of salt, but I have also been using way too many Tums, although I know that they're bad for you. :oops: Some evenings and nights I take 1500mgs, perhaps more than once.

I'm thinking it's more of a habit now. I rarely get acid reflux, but I know it can cause cancer of the esophagus, so I try to avoid the heartburn at night. Starting last night, I'm breaking the habit, and didn't take tums or baking soda. When I felt heartburn coming on, I drank a glass of water instead. Usually get the feeling in bed when I turn in certain positions.

I have noticed some cramping at night in my toes, something I haven't had since I was taking those Zumba classes, so you're probably right about the calcium. I usually take vitamin k2 daily also, but lately I've been giving myself a break from supplements a couple of days a week, something you also recommended in the past.
 

Dragon Lady

New member
Joined
Mar 13, 2013
Location
Virginia Beach
I understand the avoidance. They prescribe too much. However, I do get tests for things, look at the results and make up my own mind to take a medication or not.
 

mommysunshine

New member
Joined
Oct 23, 2010
Location
Sunny, tropical, CA.
Great that your taking those supplements to help your kidney's. Now is the time to up your water consumption. If you can, drink a liter several times a day. Consider it medicine because it really is.

I was just reading the other day about reflux/acid indigestion and it was stated that it could be a microbe infection in the stomach. The body creates additional acid in an attempt to kill the microbe but the microbe isn't affected by the acid. The person ends up with extra acid in the stomach. H-pylori was the bacteria.
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
I've heard that about h.pylori as well. It's a mess. It is able to protect itself by the creation of a type of ammonia which neutralizes the stomach acid. The best way to eliminate h.pylori is mastic gum. http://www.iherb.com/Nutricology-Mastic-Gum-120-Veggie-Caps/3450 and yogurt. Since mastic is a resin, it is good to take something to clear the kidneys. The kidneys have a difficult time with resin.

Speaking of clearing the kidneys, that Solaray formula that k2c found is excellent. Nettle would work by itself, but all herbs work better in combination with other supporting herbs. It's always great to find a good formula. I haven't figured out why the bottle label says "should not be used for extended periods." So beware of that k2c. I don't see which herb would cause that warning.

The thing with nettle and the kidneys is that it is an astringent, diuretic, tonic, anodyne, pectoral, rubefacient, styptic, anthelmintic, nutritive, alterative, hemetic, anti-rheumatic, anti-allergenic, anti-lithic/lithotriptic, haemostatic, stimulant, decongestant, herpatic, febrifuge, kidney depurative/nephritic, galactagogue, hypoglycemic, expectorant, anti-spasmodic, and anti-histamine. You just can't beat that, or get such help from any other herb that I know of.

And for kidney stones - well - a
s a diuretic, stinging nettle increases the secretion and flow of urine. This makes it invaluable in cases of fluid retention and bladder infections. It is also anti-lithic and nephridic, breaking down stones in the kidneys and gravel in the bladder. http://www.herballegacy.com/Vance_Medicinal.html
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Original Poster
Great that your taking those supplements to help your kidney's. Now is the time to up your water consumption. If you can, drink a liter several times a day. Consider it medicine because it really is.

I was just reading the other day about reflux/acid indigestion and it was stated that it could be a microbe infection in the stomach. The body creates additional acid in an attempt to kill the microbe but the microbe isn't affected by the acid. The person ends up with extra acid in the stomach. H-pylori was the bacteria.
Thanks mommysunshine, I've been drinking a lot of water to flush out the kidneys, also adding lemon juice to it at times. My mother always took antacids when I was young, Titralac brand with aluminum :evil:, and she had a hiatal hernia. My sister also has one now, and she's taking prescription acid reducers daily, she's not open to trying natural supplements instead. I don't have a lot of symptoms, so I'm hoping it's just something that will improve with care.

Speaking of clearing the kidneys, that Solaray formula that k2c found is excellent. Nettle would work by itself, but all herbs work better in combination with other supporting herbs. It's always great to find a good formula. I haven't figured out why the bottle label says "should not be used for extended periods." So beware of that k2c. I don't see which herb would cause that warning.
Thanks for the info on Mastic and Nettle jfh! I remember seeing that warning just on regular Dandelion supplements, not to use for extended periods of time.
 


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