My Omega 3 Question

Selah

New member
Joined
Feb 15, 2013
OK, I'm curious to know, what is the best source of Omega 3's because the Omega-3 supplement I have is by the brand Nature Made and I don't really feel any good benefits from it, I've been on it for a week and I just stopped taking it yesterday because my hunger has slowed, it's made me feel tired, when I stopped taking it for some reason I feel great, so I'm not sure if it works when you get off of it or it just wasn't a good product.

What's the best way to get Omega 3's in my body? Oil? Supplement? If so which brands work best?
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
I've been using NOW brand lemon flavored liquid omega 3 fish oil for years. It's made in Norway, free of contaminants like mercury, heavy metals, PCBs, dioxins, etc.

Organic flaxseeds are a good source of Omega 3 too. Here are some ways to get Omega 3 into your body...https://www.natmedtalk.com/wiki/Omega_3
 

JanH

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Location
California
Knight of Albion, don't we already get too many Omega-6s? Seems we'd want to supplement the 3s and 9s, perhaps, but not add more 6s. I take flaxseed oil and krill oil, as well as grinding up flaxseeds to mix in yogurt and other foods.
 

knightofalbion

New member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Location
Glastonbury, England
Knight of Albion, don't we already get too many Omega-6s? Seems we'd want to supplement the 3s and 9s, perhaps, but not add more 6s. I take flaxseed oil and krill oil, as well as grinding up flaxseeds to mix in yogurt and other foods.
The formula is devised to provide EFAs in the ideal natural ratio thus maximizing the effective uptake and conversion of omega 3.

Plus exclusive use of omega 3 rich flax oil can lead to omega 6 deficiency within 2 - 8 months.

As always with nutritional complexes there needs to be balance.

Some excellent articles on plant-based EFAs...

http://www.udoerasmus.com/products/oil_blend_en.htm

http://www.udoerasmus.com/articles/udo/fish_oil.htm

http://www.udoerasmus.com/articles/misc/oils-EFA-fish-vs-plant-omega.htm
 

majbsb

New member
Joined
Jul 19, 2011
Location
England
Where do you think the fish get their omega 3 from? ALGAE!!! Thats where you need to look. I've moved away from fish oils and prefer to get my omega 3's from algae. Look on the mercola.com website he sells omega 3 from an algae source.
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA
Knight of Albion, don't we already get too many Omega-6s? Seems we'd want to supplement the 3s and 9s, perhaps, but not add more 6s. I take flaxseed oil and krill oil, as well as grinding up flaxseeds to mix in yogurt and other foods.

Yes, we do. Here's a good article on oils.

The Definitive Guide to Oils

Before you can hope to make it as a speculator and start slingin’ barrels for big money, you’ve got to understand exactly what’s gushing forth from the earth’s crust. Yes, that’s right – it doesn’t start and stop just with crude, and there’s far more to oil than dinosaur bones. In fact, most experts agree that the bulk of crude oil is derived from prehistoric single-celled plankton remains. Then you’ve got the abiogenic theory, which posits that…
Er, wrong oils. Sorry.
Today’s post is actually about edible oils. Well, they’re all technically edible – they can all be swallowed and digested – but as for being palatable, let alone healthful? That remains to be seen. Not all oils are created equal, especially given the fact that most of the ones people use nowadays are actually created in an industrial laboratory. No oil “exists naturally,” mind you. Olive oil isn’t harvested by leaving open containers under leaking, dripping olives on the branch, nor is that liquid sloshing around inside a coconut pure oil. I’m not trying to disparage processing in and of itself. It takes a certain amount of processing to get any sort of oil, but a good general rule is to avoid consuming the oils that require processing on a large scale. If it involves an industrial plant, multiple stainless steel vats, a deodorizer, a de-gummer, and the harsh petroleum-derived solvent known as hexane, I wouldn’t eat it. But that’s just me (and Grok, who probably wasn’t processing wild rapeseed to get the precious canola oil).
 

aloe1

New member
Joined
Feb 27, 2013
Location
Pompano Beach, Florida
Why look to a supplement for a proper omega balance?

The concept behind supplementing with omega 3's is that you are out of balance because you eat too many omega 6's and not enough omega 3's. Omega 6's (largely from corn) are in most processed foods we eat and even in animal foods since the animals - cows, chickens, etc., even fish, are largely fed grain diets. Doesn't it make more sense to stop eating foods fed corn or made with corn, corn syrup, corn starch, and start consuming more healthy foods that have the proper balance of omega 3,6,9?
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Why look to a supplement for a proper omega balance?
But is it practicable, for most people, in the current financial climate, to totally renounce cheap supermarket meats and produce and only frequent the grassfed pasture raised organically produced farms?

There is a limit to what is reasonable to expect in the current financial situation We only have so much time, energy and money. We have to learn how to make sensible compromise decisions.

The Terrible Tragedy of the Healthy Eater

IMO a fish oil or marine sourced omega 3 supplement is a reasonable compromise for the meals I eat out or the bought prepared meals I sometimes resort to.
Omega 3 plays an important part in maintaining cognitive function and while it's great to be idealistic it's also sensible to ensure you don't set unrealistic goals and always keep your omega 3 status optimal.

It's the omega 3 EPA and DHA that the brain requires and the amount that's obtained from plant sources is minimal if not non-existent in most humans.
 

aloe1

New member
Joined
Feb 27, 2013
Location
Pompano Beach, Florida
I must admit Ted_Hutchinson, it has been so long since my family has had conventional meats and processed foods that I forget how long it took to transition. 10 years ago, we used supplements. Little by little we transitioned to nutrient dense foods. It definitely took time, learning how and where to shop. And, of course, real foods cost more money. We also farm the yard that surrounds our home. We eat lots from the yard every day. Certainly many can't do it. Your point is well taken.
 

aloe1

New member
Joined
Feb 27, 2013
Location
Pompano Beach, Florida
Ted, thank you for the humorous read "The Terrible Tragedy of the Healthy Eater". My family eats much like that - homemade lacto fermented mayo made with eggs from the back yard. Plenty of Kale, etc. Of course, we would never buy yogurt - make our own kefir from grass fed dairy we buy from our Amish friends. I could go on... but you get it.
 

Ted_Hutchinson

New member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Ted, thank you for the humorous read "The Terrible Tragedy of the Healthy Eater". My family eats much like that - homemade lacto fermented mayo made with eggs from the back yard. Plenty of Kale, etc. Of course, we would never buy yogurt - make our own kefir from grass fed dairy we buy from our Amish friends. I could go on... but you get it.
I know where your at, I'm nearly there with raw milk, home made yoghurt and loads of stuff from the garden but I do think there comes a point where compromise is necessary.
I'd rather use Flux than resort to candles.
 


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