Fish Oil Tablets

spideyfanman

New member
Joined
Oct 24, 2006
I bought a bottle of fish oil tablets which are meant to take daily. I was wondering if this was a good idea, and will it have any effect on my physical strength/health as well?
 

Judie777

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Joined
Jul 18, 2008
Location
Just moved to Kenosha, WI.
Research..

I bought a bottle of fish oil tablets which are meant to take daily. I was wondering if this was a good idea, and will it have any effect on my physical strength/health as well?
Visit naturalnews.com , or just do Google ....put in omega3 oils, or fish oil in the search box......both excellent info sources on any drug, herb, vitamin or supplement you're needing info on...... :p
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
Good idea spidy. The omega3 oils, in those tablets, may help to offset the not so good oils that seem to be so much of your diet. There should be a balance of the omega3 and omega6 oils. It will be of great benefit to your health. I'm not sure of the strength part.

Omega-3 and Omega-6

Two important polyunsaturated fatty acids are linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. Linoleic acid is used to build omega-6 fatty acids and alpha-linolenic acid is used to build omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids cannot be synthesized in the body and must be supplied by the diet. They are called essential fatty acids. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are important in the normal functioning of all tissues of the body. You should make sure you include good sources of omega-3 and omega-6 each day.
Pregnant women have an increased need for omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. They are needed for the fetal growth, brain development, learning and behavior. Lactating women should also increase their fatty acids intake, since infants receive their essential fatty acids through the breast milk.
Omega-6 fatty acids can be found in leafy vegetables, seeds, nuts, grains and vegetable oils (corn, safflower, soybean, cottonseed, sesame, sunflower). Most diets provide adequate amounts of omega-6. Unless you eat a diet that is extremely low in fat, it is very easy to get more than enough omega-6. Supplementation of omega-6 is usually not necessary.
Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in far less foods than omega-6 fatty acids. Many people have a very low intake of omega-3s. Since omega-6 fatty acids compete with omega-3 fatty acids for use in the body, it is important to take these fatty acids in the proper ratio. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 should be about 2:1. Since most diets are very rich in omega-6 and low in omega-3, the ratio is often somewhere between 10:1 and 20:1. This is especially a problem with diets that are high in processed foods and oils. OIls like corn, safflower, sunflower and cottonseed are usually low in omega-3s. To balance the fatty acids out, it is important to eat a diet that is low in processed foods and with fat mainly coming from omega-3 fatty acids.
Many people have a deficiency of omega-3 without realizing it, since the symptoms can often be attributed to other health conditions or nutrient deficiencies. Symptoms of an omega-3 deficiency include fatigue, dry and/or itchy skin, brittle hair and nails, constipation, depression, frequent colds, poor concentration, lack of physical endurance and joint pain.
Good Omega-3 sources


  • ground flaxseed
  • oils (like flaxseed oil, linseed oil, canola oil, walnut oil, wheat germ oil and soybean oil)
  • green leafy vegetables (like lettuce, broccoli, kale, spinach and purslane)
  • legumes (like mungo, kidney, navy, pinto, lima beans, peas and split peas)
  • citrus fruits, melons, cherries
Omega-3s are damaged by heat, so the oils should not be cooked with. They are also damaged by oxidation; that's why you should store the oils in dark bottles in the refrigerator or freezer.
The absolute best source of omega-3 are flaxseeds. One tablespoon of ground flaxseed will supply the daily requirement of omega-3. Flaxseeds need to be ground for your body to be able to absorb the omega-3 from them. You can grind flaxseeds in a spice grinder. Once flaxseeds are ground, the shells don't protect them from oxidation anymore and you will need to store them in the refrigerator or freezer, just like the oils.
Omega-9

Omega-9 is a family of fatty acids which includes two major fatty acids called stearic acid and oleic acid. Stearic acid is a saturated fat which can be converted to oleic acid, which is monounsaturated. Oleic acid is the most abundant fatty acid found in nature and the primary oil produced by skin glands.
Omega-9 is a nonessential fatty acid, since it is produced naturally by the body. It does not need to be supplemented. Omega-9 is mainly used when there is an insufficiency of either omega-3, omega-6 or both. When the body doesn't have enough omega-3 or omega-6, it tries to compensate by producing omega-9 fatty acids to take their place. Omega-9 derivatives aren't as effective as omega-3 or omega-6 though and our health will eventually suffer.

http://www.veganpeace.com/nutrient_information/nutrient_info/omega_info.htm
 

Cedy

New member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Location
Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies
Krill Oil is the new kid on the block. Some say it is as good as fish oil. Some say it is better. Whichever you choose, do not neutralize its effectiveness by eating JUNK.
 

EarlyBird

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Location
Northern Ky.
Omega 3's - flaxseeds

One good thing with grinding your own flaxseeds daily is that you can sprinkle them
on a salad on in yogurt, or even on baked or mashed potatoes.
If using them on your salad you can get added benefits by using XVOOil too.
Double your pleasure and health benefits!
 

spideyfanman

New member
Joined
Oct 24, 2006
Original Poster
Does anyone know if Silk Soymilk is good to have? (The one my mom buys is vanilla flavored). It has 7 grams of sugar. Is it better to have non-fat milk?
 

just me

New member
Joined
Apr 9, 2006
Location
im lost, have no idea
I personally dont believe soy anything is good for you. messes with the hormones too much!!! If it has to be, drink the non-fat milk. I personally believe that you should drink regular whole milk... raw organic milk would be better for you... but being on the smaller side, I dont see why you would want to eat or drink anything lo or no fat..
 

kind2creatures

...elusive dreamer
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Location
USA
Does anyone know if Silk Soymilk is good to have? (The one my mom buys is vanilla flavored). It has 7 grams of sugar. Is it better to have non-fat milk?
I agree with Just me, I stay away from soy as much as I can. I use Rice Dream, and would try almond milk also. The Rice Dream has 10 grams sugars.
 

spideyfanman

New member
Joined
Oct 24, 2006
Original Poster
I personally dont believe soy anything is good for you. messes with the hormones too much!!! If it has to be, drink the non-fat milk. I personally believe that you should drink regular whole milk... raw organic milk would be better for you... but being on the smaller side, I dont see why you would want to eat or drink anything lo or no fat..
well the only reason I was drinking it was because my mom was buying it. I would like to drink whole milk since I hear you benefit more from it, even though it has more fat and all.
 

D Bergy

New member
Joined
Apr 16, 2006
Unfermented Soy products have stuff in them that mimics Estrogen, a predominately female Hormone. I do not think any male should touch the stuff. I am not real sure it is good for anyone.

Dan
 

spideyfanman

New member
Joined
Oct 24, 2006
Original Poster
Unfermented Soy products have stuff in them that mimics Estrogen, a predominately female Hormone. I do not think any male should touch the stuff. I am not real sure it is good for anyone.

Dan
hmm, interesting. Thanks for the info!
 

jfh

perpetual student
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Location
Texas, USA
Many of the common foods we eat, and that are considered healthy, are actually phytoestrogen sources. These include sage, parsley, yams (extremely high), peas, kudzu, beans, carrots, bananas, oranges, grains, barley, grapes, baker's yeast, beets, pomegranates, cherries, garlic, oats, olives, peppers, sunflower seeds, flax seed, rye, spinach, sesame seeds, pumpkin, rhubarb, tomatoes, rice, plums, potatoes, papaya, dates, eggplant, anise, fennel, cucumber, peanuts, soybeans, and onions. And there are beverages people think are healthy, at least in moderation. These include green tea, grape juice, and wines. Beer, ouzo, gin, and whiskey are also very high in phytoestrogens. Then there are flavonoids, which also have phytoestrogen-like effects. These are also found in many foods including berries and onions.

If you really want to avoid phytoestrogens they will pretty much need to stop eating and drinking.
 

bbmartin

New member
Joined
May 9, 2009
I used to take fish oil capsules daily for the essential fatty acids. My doctor recommended switching to cod liver oil, which I did. Cod liver oil is an excellent source of Vitamin D as well as essential fatty acids. I use Carlson's brand of cod liver oil, I don't have to plug my nose when I take it - it's more pure.

Anyone needing a basic understanding of fats and fatty acids and their role in health, check out http://www.improving-health-and-energy.com/types-of-dietary-fat.html

Cheers,
BB
 

jw8725

New member
Joined
May 24, 2009
Location
England
I used to take fish oil capsules daily for the essential fatty acids. My doctor recommended switching to cod liver oil, which I did. Cod liver oil is an excellent source of Vitamin D as well as essential fatty acids. I use Carlson's brand of cod liver oil, I don't have to plug my nose when I take it - it's more pure.

Anyone needing a basic understanding of fats and fatty acids and their role in health, check out http://www.improving-health-and-energy.com/types-of-dietary-fat.html

Cheers,
BB
Hi can I ask why he asked you to switch over to Cod liver oil? That tends to be a bit high on the Vitamin A side which can be toxic at the higher quantities we tend to take the oil at.

I take my Vitamin D3 in fish oils along with Vitamin K2.
 

D Bergy

New member
Joined
Apr 16, 2006
Too much Vitamin A, which Cod Liver Oil has a lot of, also contributes to Osteoporosis.

Dan
 

bbmartin

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Joined
May 9, 2009
I always research myself when I get bits of data like the above. This is from http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/clarifications.html - an excellent article from The Weston A. Price Foundation entitled:
Vitamin A, Vitamin D and Cod Liver Oil: Some Clarifications


Vitamin A Dosage

We have pointed out that concerns about vitamin A toxicity are exaggerated. While some forms of synthetic vitamin A found in supplements can be toxic at only moderately high doses, fat-soluble vitamin A naturally found in foods like cod liver oil, liver, and butterfat is safe at up to ten times the doses of water-soluble, solidified, and emulsified vitamin A found in some supplements that produce toxicity.(1)

Additionally, the vitamin D found in cod liver oil and butterfat from pasture-raised animals protects against vitamin A toxicity, and allows one to consume a much higher amount of vitamin A before it becomes toxic.(1-3)

Liver from land mammals is high in vitamin A but low in vitamin D, and should therefore be consumed with other vitamin D-rich foods such as lard or bacon from pasture-raised pigs, egg yolks, and oily fish, or during months in which UV-B light is sufficient to provide one with adequate vitamin D.

As a general guideline, we recommend the following doses of vitamin A from cod liver oil, along with a nutrient-dense diet that contains other vitamin A-rich foods:
Children age 3 months to 12 years: A dose of cod liver oil that provides about 5000 IU vitamin A daily
Children over 12 years and adults: A maintenance dose of cod liver oil that provides about 10,000 IU vitamin A daily
Pregnant and nursing women: A dose of cod liver oil that provides about 20,000 IU vitamin A daily
Individuals under stress or wishing to use cod liver oil to treat a disease condition may take much larger doses, even up to 90,000 IU vitamin A per day, for a period of several weeks.
Here is another reference on Vitamin A http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/vitaminasaga.html

My doctor prescribed it for my heart - I had a heart attack and have congestive heart failure and I will not take large dosages of prescription meds. The cod liver oil benefits heart function in many ways.

1 teaspoon of cod liver oil (which is what I take daily) has:
Vitamin A: 700 - 1200 IU

The RDA (which is being revised because the recommendations are too low) is 3,000 IU for an adult male and 2,300 IU for an adult female. People with stress and health conditions can take even more.

The "Vitamin A is toxic" comes from an anti-vitamin A campaign that began in 1995. This scare claims that low levels of Vitamin A are toxic, which is false. Please read this reference http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/vitaminasaga.html

Additionally, if a person has diabetes, their body cannot convert beta carotene to Vitamin A.

Cheers,
BB
 

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