Cheaper ToothPaste: Easy as it Sounds:

tick

New member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
OK... So we all try and save money right.. Well, I was looking around at what works as a good (not harmful) toothpaste and I came across a place that was simply mixing together baking soda, mint and water... Apparently it is almost as good for you as if you use normal toothpaste and in fact even better as it doesn't have the harmful crap in it just in case you swallow.

The same place told me that an inexpensive mouthwash was simply VODKA and cinnamon.... Well there ya go, and it was shown to be just as effective at killing germs as the commercial brands, and it was BETTER at killing bad breath! The biggest selling point for me though, as soon as you are done swirling and swishing you don't need to worry about spitting out, just swallow and enjoy the shot for the day! (OK, DON'T call me an Alcoholic for that!)
 

Arrowwind09

Standing at the Portal
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
I use baking soda all the time to brush with. To make it better in preventing cavities I mix it with Xylitol sugar which reduces cavities. mix 25% of xylitol into your baking soda.
 

clairebear83

New member
Joined
Oct 1, 2012
Well apparently alcohol is very bad for your mouth (linked to cancer) and teeth (I think) and so you should never (or at least only rarely) use alcohol based mouthwash like listerine for example.

Don't know of any good cheap alternatives though, unless you want to go to Malawi that is where there is a tree/bush that grows these little sort of toothbush things and a pod of cream that you can use as toothpaste. Sounds weird but it's true! Tried it but really didn't like the flavour of the 'toothpaste' but if you were used to it I suppose it would be ok!
 

tick

New member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
Original Poster
I agree, I stopped using alcohol based mouthwashes...https://www.natmedtalk.com/showthread.php?t=4955

Damn.... Why is it all the stuff that really works is so bad for you? It's almost as if we're not supposed to even bother...

I guess that's sort of like how they used to think smoking was OK for you too. So who knows.

But I guess in a way it makes sense.. When you drink alcohol and some a cigarette you seem to notice the cigarette more, it was sort of a leveling effect, if only for a while. *sigh... I guess time to start looking again...
 

tick

New member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
Original Poster
You can take a small covered jar and mix 2 teaspoons of baking soda (aluminum-free Bob's Red Mill), 1/2 cup water, 4 drops of peppermint or tea tree oil.
I've tried that before I think. Thanks for the tip, I'll whip up a batch quickly tonight.

I have also heard that you can swap out mint for other kinds of leaves like eucalyptus, is that true? (I'm thinking you might know).

I could see it might work, as eucalyptus, as it's got all those healing properties..
 

tick

New member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
Original Poster
Baking soda and hydrogen peroxide is another alternative.
Some may find the taste a problem.

Damn right the taste would be horrid.. I would think it would defeat the purpose as I'd be upchucking what I had for dinner, and need to brush my teeth again... Mouthwash again... I see a running gag in there somewhere...

:shock:
 

Solstice Goat

Frater Aegagrus
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Location
Seattle, WA
Hydrogen peroxide

Hydrogen Peroxide in Wound Care.
Action is the mechanical cleansing and debridement by effervescent action. Considerations when using are:

1. Can cause ulceration of newly formed tissue Toxic to fibroblasts
2. Should never be used to pack sinus tracts: can cause air embolism
3. Should not be used for forceful irrigation; can cause subcutaneous emphysema, which mimics gas gangrene

Data from Cooper, D: Fundamental; products and their usage. In Guide to Wound Care, Chicago, 1983

Many studies have documented that the use of hydrogen peroxide in open wounds is not only cytotoxic to bacteria, but also to white blood cells and vital wound healing cells such as fibroblasts. This is because their primary mechanism of action is to destroy cell walls regardless of the identity of the cell. The use of cytotoxic agents in wounds should be weighed in light of this. In addition to the absence of clinical benefit, antiseptics may also encourage the development of resistant organisms.
http://www.essentialdrugs.org/edrug/arch…

http://opinion.antonypranata.com/2006/08…
 

tick

New member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
Original Poster
*sigh... Round and Round the mulberry bush the monkey chased the weasel, the weasel thought it was all in fun... POP goes the weasel....

The internet is very thesis, anti-thesis, everything you can possibly dig up has itself rebutted two pages later....

Makes you wonder what is really true in the web of deception :shock:
 


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