Cervical erosion and CIN3

diane25

New member
Joined
Feb 25, 2017
Location
NY, USA
[FONT=&quot]Hi.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]When I turned 28 I booked a smear test straight away. My results came back in around five days which was quite alarming and the letter read that I would need to make an urgent hospital referral due to an abnormal result. I went for a colposcopy examination shortly after and was diagnosed with CIN3 and severe cervical erosion (pre-cancerous cells of the cervix at a high grade level, also known as severe dyskaryosis. My symptoms were iregular spotting/bleeding especially after sex and increased vaginal discharge.Whilst I was having the colposcopy examination however after a more thorough observation, the pre-cancerous cells covered a large area of my cervix and it was decided it would be better and more comfortable for me to receive the CERVUGID Ovules (vaginal suppositories) and Isoprinosine Tablets. So i under went treatment asap. I finished the treatment in about 8 months because it must be done in 2 courses and I was rescheduled again to be retested.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]I waited patiently for my letter to confirm whether if all of the pre-cancerous cells been cured or whether I would need further treatment. This was a very anxious time and, although no news is good news, I was desperate to hear from the hospital. I received my letter four weeks later confirming that they were confident that all of the cells were cured but I would need to return to the hospital six months later for another colposcopy. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The time passed quite quickly and I tried to put any negative thoughts to the back of my mind. Six months later I was back at the hospital where a 'white' area was still showing and there were concerns that not all of the cells have been cured. They took a sample and sent me home and I awaited the good news; the area was due to healing and could be scar tissue. Due to my having high grade cell changes I was fortunate enough to be entitled to a relatively new test;hpv testing These tests, which look for the Human Papillomavirus which causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers, came back negative to my relief. As a result, I was told I would be able to go back to the normal screening frequency – every year. [/FONT]
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