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Old 05-22-2015, 10:02 AM
u&iraok u&iraok is offline
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Default Pasteurized milk vs raw milk circa 1954

I just had to post this. I ran across this statement in Pearl S. Buck's autobiography, My Several Worlds, page 383, published in 1954:



"To live in the country and drink pasteurized milk, as one must in the city, seemed absurd. The precious vitamins of raw milk, so essential to children, are too often destroyed or all but, by pasteurization, especially if it is well done. If it is carelessly done as it may be, then such milk is more dangerous than raw milk, for the process gives the excuse for all sorts of milk to be poured into the vats, certainly not all of it clean. An I am prejudiced against dirt, dead or alive, in food. I wish that my countrymen were all clean, but the truth is we Americans are not a very clean people, not nearly so clean as the Japanese, for example, or the Swedish, or several others. Our farmers are content too often with dirty barns and dirty cows hastily swabbed around the udders before milking time. I did not at all like what I saw on farms, and this, too, moved me to have my own. "
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Old 05-22-2015, 01:23 PM
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She did seem to have a "thing" for cleanliness in regards to food.

I once had the privilege of having lunch with Pearl S. Buck. She was visiting a family of which I befriended. They invited me along. Ms Buck said she once visited India and was invited to an outdoor dinner with the royal family, or one of the royal families. She could not eat the food. She said there were "urchins" crawling under and around the tables, grabbing food with their dirty hands and flies everywhere. Now, this was saying a lot, because she enjoyed most people that she ever met, and sometimes they showed up as characters in a novel. She said that while she was in India she drank sodas and ate vending machine crackers to avoid the local food. She said people used the water from the Ganges where they also bathed. A remarkable lady though.
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Old 05-29-2015, 08:40 AM
u&iraok u&iraok is offline
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That's neat that you met her. I got the same idea, that she loved people and children. China was her first country and first language and she had a love for the peasants. She adopted several children and started Welcome House, an adoption agency that was formed to help place bi-racial children. Based on her books and autobiography I have great admiration for her.

I think she was afraid of germs because of the tropical diseases in China at the time she was growing up. Most of her siblings died from diseases and her mother died from Sprue. They had to boil their water and be careful what they ate. She noted that the Chinese would recover from many of the diseases but not the white foreigners so they had to be extra careful.

But the reason I post this is because I'm constantly noting that so many things we are just finding out for ourselves in our time, especially in the health arena, were already known decades ago, such as the problems of pasteurized milk, but hidden or forgotten by subsequent generations. Some have been telling it for years but their voice was lost under the propaganda of the main stream. Also we hear about how many farmers have filthy practices and they feel that that's okay because pasteurization will kill the germs though dead toxins and germs also have an effect on health.
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Old 05-29-2015, 01:32 PM
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I understand what you mean.

Decades ago when I lived in Fresno, CA, I would occasionally visit an almond orchard way out in the country. I went there, because this short little old Italian lady had goats that she would milk. She actually was lucky to have a cave on her farm. A real cave. Not just a root cellar. It had a dirt floor, but the rest of it was at least as clean as my house. She "cured" her goat cheese in there. That's what I was there for. Well worth the drive and the visit.

No pasteurization. Just everything cleaned very well.
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