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Old 11-01-2006, 02:44 PM
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Default Prostate Cancer question?

Was just informed that a friend has Prostate Cancer. He is in his mid 70’s.
Just did a quick check of conventional treatments that his doctor might recommend, there is nothing there that looks like it be would a whole bunch of fun or effective.
I don’t know if he is open to alternative treatment, but I was wondering what the experts here would recommend.
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Old 11-02-2006, 12:33 AM
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Mad. my husband has/had prostate cancer with secondaries in his spine and pelvic bones - that was three and half years ago. He is having anti-androgen injections from the medics.
He is also doing a great deal of "alternative" therapy.

Budwig protocol, as far as it fits into
The Blood Type Diet by D'Adamo
A Chinese herbal medicine for prostate cancer.
Graviola
Essiac
Lycopene
Pumpkin oil
Apricot seeds

Our diet is entirely local, organic food. Absolutely nothing processed or ready made. Raw milk.

D tried IP6 but it caused abdominal bloating and nausea.
He is completely symptom free since about 2 months after diagnosis
(apart from a recent injury related to renovations)

I hope your friend will be willing to make the effort to help himself - many do not, and I am not sure that it alters the outcome in the end. I treat an elderly man with the same problem as my husband. This man has pain from spinal metastases. He would not consider the regime my husband follows - having acupuncture treatment is "far out" for him!!
He is 5 years down the road since diagnosis and enjoys a full life, only mildy restricted when he is walking.
I can't claim to know the answer, but I do claim to make the effort!
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Old 11-02-2006, 10:21 AM
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Thanks for the information. I plan to do some more research on this, but figured I would ask here first.

I have talked to him about alternative medicine in the past, so after he finds out his doctor wants him to do (or do to him) maybe he will be willing to try something different. We shall see. Thanks again for the info.
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Old 11-02-2006, 10:43 AM
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Some prostate cancers are more aggressive than others. To determine which is which a biopsy is needed, which is a problem in itself.

I would say that Xania is on the right course with her husband considering the mets he has and no symptoms!

There is a treatment done in Canada where they treat either with hot or cold, cant remember which. I think if you do a search you will find it. The outcome is suppose to very good.
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Old 11-02-2006, 11:27 AM
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Arrow, the patient referred to above has had a session of "Thermotherapy" during which his docs told him that the cancer was being "burned" out. Could that be the same?
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Old 11-02-2006, 01:16 PM
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Default prostate cancer

Dr. Wright's most recent newsletter mentions an effective treatment for prostate cancer (if PSA readings are under 20) which is available at two centers in Canada. It is called high-density focused ultrasound (HIFU) and is used in the U. S. at present only for uterine fibroids. He says there is a video of the procedure at: www.hifu.ca

Mike
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Old 01-31-2007, 01:34 AM
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Dietary and herbal therapies are especially effective at reducing the swelling and balancing the hormones.

The following nutritional components may be beneficial. Saw Palmetto Extract contains phytochemicals, which support prostate and urinary health in men. Nettle is a diuretic that can help clear out excess liquid and uric acid. Pygeum helps shrink the prostate to relieve urinary problems. Zinc is needed to repair wounds, boost immunity, and protect against free radicals. Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant. Copper is needed with long-term use of zinc, because zinc inhibits copper absorption. Flaxseed contains essential fatty acids (EFA) that help to correct possible EFA deficiencies. L-Alanine is present in prostate fluid, and it may play a role in supporting prostate health. A study has shown that the combination of Amino Acid Mix, Glycine, L-Glutamine and L-Alanine may relieve feeling an urgency to urinate.
Dietitians are important members of the health care team that assists people with cancer, to help them get through the tough period of time.

Do not take these statements as medical advice. If you think you may be in need of treatment, please contact a healthcare professional.
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Old 01-31-2007, 05:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xania
Mad. my husband has/had prostate cancer with secondaries in his spine and pelvic bones - that was three and half years ago. He is having anti-androgen injections from the medics.
He is also doing a great deal of "alternative" therapy.

Budwig protocol, as far as it fits into

The Blood Type Diet by D'Adamo
A Chinese herbal medicine for prostate cancer.
Graviola
Essiac
Lycopene
Pumpkin oil
Apricot seeds

Our diet is entirely local, organic food. Absolutely nothing processed or
ready made. Raw milk.

D tried IP6 but it caused abdominal bloating and nausea.
He is completely symptom free since about 2 months after diagnosis
(apart from a recent injury related to renovations)
I recently have been corresponding with one of the more gentlemanly yet science minded forces at the Weston Price Organization. I told him about Mike's illness and asked if he had any suggestions.
His reply:
Quote:
I don't have any thoughts except that I've recently been reading some
research pretty strongly arguing that calcium can contribute to prostate
cancer by decreasing the activation of vitamin D, whereas dietary vitamin D
is protective, because it increases the differentiation of prostate cells
and pushes cancerous cells out of that stage. Perhaps extra vitamin D would help him.
In view of his response, I've decided to stop taking my cal/mag supplements. The only dairy in my diet now, is yogurt. My calcium will come from cold ocean fish, nuts, veggies, and my local thermal spring water.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Quote:
Using blood samples collected during one study, researchers found that men with the highest levels of the omega-3 fatty acid ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) in their bloodstreams were three times as likely to develop prostate cancer compared with those in whom the fatty acid could not be detected. Similarly, another study found that men who consumed the highest amounts of ALA were nearly twice as likely to develop advanced prostate cancer. In both of these studies, as in the typical American diet, the primary source of ALA was animal and dairy products, particularly red meat.

At the same time, however, consumption of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), two omega-3 fatty acids found mostly in fatty fish, was associated with a lower risk of developing advanced prostate cancer. In fact, eating the equivalent of 3 servings of fish per week cut the risk of developing advanced prostate cancer in half.

Eating red meat high in ALA can increase the risk of developing advanced prostate cancer, but eating fish high in EPA and DHA can decrease the risk

ALA is an essential fatty acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the body, that is used as the building block for certain cellular processes. Therefore, eliminating it from the diet cannot be recommended. Nevertheless, replacing red meat with fatty fish one or two times a week would seem to be a good way to swap out some of the "bad" fat and replace it with some of the “good” fat. And before going off to the health food store to increase your intake of DHA and EPA, keep in mind that the benefits did not extend to those men who were taking fish oil supplements. ProstateCancerFoundation
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Old 01-31-2007, 10:39 AM
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Default something fishy

Iggy,

Something does not seem right about ALA Omega 3s being a player in prostate cancer. What about Budwig's protocol which calls for lots of ALA? Why would the ALA from flax fight cancer but the ALA in red meat promote
it?

Recently, The Prostate Cancer Foundation released the results of a study which showed that high levels of Omega 6s are implicated in prostate cancer. So which is it? Omega 3 or Omega 6? The Foundation can't have it both ways.

Besides, there isn't much ALA in red meat today. Perhaps there is something about the red meat which is the problem--the hormones, the toxic substances from grilling, or the high iron content. One study involving colon cancer showed that it wasn't the fat in the meat which resulted in higher cancer rates in the red meat eaters; it was the iron content.

Here's a nice little article which sheds more light on the issue:

Dumping on Omega-3's
It was a long, tough fight for those of us who helped shove the neglected Omega 3 (3) fats out of nutrition's gray zone into their rightful place as pivotal players. But no sooner was I settling into complacency, when odd and scary reports began drifting in. A series of articles in '93 and '94 medical journals warned that "high levels" (in the diet and in the blood) of the primary essential Omega-3 fat - alpha linolenic acid (ALA) - were associated with men's risk of developing advanced prostate cancer. Soon, newspapers and popular magazines were trumpeting the dangers of consuming vegetable oils high in ALA.

The basic study, however, had specifically found animal fats from red meats to be the chief culprits. [E. Giovannucci, et al., Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 85, No. 19, Oct. 6, 1993.] It depended solely on statistical analyses of food-frequency questionnaires, filled out in 1986 by over 47,000 men initially free of diagnosed cancer. By the beginning of 1990, follow-up questionnaires to the men revealed 300 cases of prostate cancer, 126 of these advanced.

From the men's reported food intakes, researchers concluded "animal fat, especially fat from redmeat, is associated with an elevated risk of advanced prostate cancer." Then comes the truly strange part: the actual fatty acid they found to be "most strongly related to risk" was alpha-linolenic. That's because, believe it or not, they said red meat is "relatively high" in Omega-3 ALA and low in the primary essential Omega-6 - linolenic acid. Or stated another way, "animalfat is a relatively good source of alpha-linolenic acid but a poor source of linolenic acid"
I beg your pardon, Dr. Giovannucci et al. Red meat (beef, pork and lamb) and its fat are poor sources of Omega-6 linolenic, but are far poorer sources of ALA! Consult any reliable fatty acid table: typical cuts of beef, lamb, and pork contain from 2 to 13 times more Omega-6 linolenic than Omega-3 ALA. (Note: Pork products contain about five times more Omega-6 linolenic than lamb or beef, but still only a smidgen of ALA.)

In other words, the researchers goofed on their basic premise. Their tangled statistical analyses of the diets reported some years earlier "proved" that the fat in red meat responsible for advanced prostate cancer was Omega-3 ALA, when there's little of it in red meats, and so much less of it than Omega-6 linolenic. Moreover, they did not include Omega-6 arachidonic acid content of red meats - a puzzling oversight.
The actual sources of Omega-3 ALA in the diets of the men with advanced prostate cancer probably would have been, typically, soy oil in salad dressings and cooking oils - but the researchers explicitly stated it was not ALA from vegetable sources but only ALA from animal products that was associated statistically with prostate cancer.

Great statistics!
Incidentally, the calculated levels of Omega-3 ALA in the diets, according to the researchers, ranged from low to moderate. By my standards, based on work by careful scientists, even the highest levels were very low! In contrast, Omega-6 linolenic acid intake (from salad dressings, mayonnaise, grains, etc., as well as from red meat) tended to be high, as is typical in U.S. diets. A high Omega-6, low Omega-3 intake ratio admittedly is a recipe for trouble, including cancer
.
Dr. Stephen C. Cunnane of the University of Toronto in his chapter in Flaxseed in Human Nutrition (AOCS Press, 1995) questions the interpretation given to the data, in light of "strong evidence that ALA is not cancer promoting in animals" and that "lean cuts of red meat contain almost undetectable ALA."

Processed red meats, i.e., sausage, lunch meat, etc., contain more fat, more ALA, but also more Omega-6 linolenic - again, about 6 to 8 times more linolenic than ALA.

This muddled study, full of contradictory, oddly conceived conclusions, did not deserve the hoopla it got. Nobody in the press apparently checked it against food tables but swallowed it whole, issuing wholesale warnings about red meat and/or ALA. I remember in 1981 a similar to-do in medical journalsabout ghastly consequences of taking more than 100 to 300 I.U. of vitamin E. A nurse friend cautioned me sternly about it. For years
afterwards I'd see anti-vitamin E admonitions in the medical media. I'll bet those doctors (and their patients) are sorry now, what with all the current kudos (finally!) in medical literature for vitamin E as a heart-saving, primo antioxidant.

http://barleans.com/literature/flax/...n-omega3s.html
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:18 PM
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I agree. The ALA article was contradictory to every thing I've read.
I grind flax and mix it with my oat/barley porridge every morning.
Could it be that these prostate cancer sufferers have high ALA
because they're supplementing to treat the cancer?
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Old 01-31-2007, 09:52 PM
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Default keep in mind

Keep in mind that there is a significant difference between using flax oil and using freshly ground flax seeds. The oil was advocated by Budwig. The meal is supported by recent studies. The difference? Much less ALA in the meal and much more lignans. This is not to say that the oil is bad ... it's just a different animal.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum
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