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Old 11-14-2007, 11:17 AM
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Default Pycnogenol May Help Osteoarthritis Symptoms



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Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative joint disorder and a major cause of pain and disability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effect of Pycnogenol (Horphag Research, Ltd, Geneva, Switzerland), a flavonoid-rich dietary supplement, on the symptoms of knee OA.

Thirty-seven osteoarthritic patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel-group design. Patients received either placebo or Pycnogenol pills (50 mg, three times daily) in a blinded fashion for 3 months.

Osteoarthritis clinical symptoms were evaluated monthly with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors usage was also assessed.

In the Pycnogenol group, there was a significant improvement in total WOMAC score and WOMAC subscale score of pain and physical function at 60 and 90 days of treatment.

At 90 days, significant reduction of 43%, 35%, 52%, and 49% in self-reported pain, stiffness, physical function, and composite WOMAC score, respectively, were reported in Pycnogenol group, whereas the placebo group showed no significant changes.

The dosage and frequency of NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors usage were increased in placebo group, which were significantly less in Pycnogenol group. The results of this study indicate the efficacy of Pycnogenol in alleviating osteoarthritis symptoms and reducing the need for NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors administration.

This beneficial effect of Pycnogenol might be due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Further research is warranted to determine the underlying mechanism associated with this apparent effect.
Pycnogenol and Osteoarthritis
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Old 11-14-2007, 12:51 PM
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I am sold on pycogenol for allergies, especially mountain cedar and pine. No wonder - homeopathic!
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Old 11-14-2007, 02:33 PM
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I'm also sold on Pycnogenol - though it isn't cheap. I like/respect the fact that the manufacturer has invested so much time and money to earn the public's (and some physicians') trust.
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Old 11-14-2007, 09:08 PM
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I take Pycnogenol because it is one of the few antioxidants that can cross the blood-brain barrier and protect the brain.(helps prevent brain aging).
It boosts the immune system, and is also good for skin and eyes.
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Old 09-03-2008, 11:25 AM
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"The current study is in accordance with the two previous Pycnogenol studies for osteoarthritis," said Dr. Peter Rohdewald, one of the researchers of the study. "Again the pain is gradually decreasing during the course of three months treatment with Pycnogenol. An improvement is found after the first month and a further improvement is seen after two months, where values are significantly different to the placebo group. This study again showed that patients required significantly less analgesic medication while supplementing with Pycnogenol, whereas this was not the case with the placebo-treated control group."

The study was held at Slovakia's Comenius University School of Medicine. One hundred patients with stage I or II OA were included in the study and were randomly allocated to either a Pycnogenol or placebo group. Patients were supplemented with 150 mg Pycnogenol or placebo per day over a period of three months. They were allowed to continue taking their NSAID or analgesics prescribed before the study but had to record every pill taken.

The established Western Ontario McMaster questionnaire for joint function was employed to rate the pain level, and obtain measures of joint stiffness and to what extent the arthritis affects participation in daily activities. Patients were investigated in two week intervals over the treatment period of three months and a final time two weeks after discontinuation of medication.

The overall score, summarizing pain, stiffness and daily activities, improved statistical significantly by 20.9 percent in the Pycnogenol group. Interestingly, the joint improvement achieved with Pycnogenol persisted after intake of Pycnogenol was discontinued for four weeks. The joint pain decreased by 40.3 percent after completion of the three months supplementation with Pycnogenol and two weeks later the pain was still 36.1 percent lower than at baseline. Furthermore, 38 percent of patients in the Pycnogenol group required less NSAID's or other analgesic medication for joint pain.

"The anti-inflammatory potency of Pycnogenol explains the success in lowering joint pain and stiffness for arthritic joints," said Rohdewald. "After three recent clinical studies on osteoarthritis, Pycnogenol continues to demonstrate its effectiveness for osteoarthritis symptoms making it a viable, natural and safe alternative for individuals. This is the first study that investigated whether a relapse of symptoms occurs after taking Pycnogenol is stopped. The results show a lasting effect after discontinuation which suggest the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of Pycnogenol has allowed the joints to recover."

In another study this year (also published in the journal of Phytotherapy Research), Pycnogenol was shown to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms by 56 percent. Moreover, patients required 58 percent less standard pain medication, which greatly improved the gastrointestinal complications resulting from the pain medication by 63 percent.

Last year, a study on osteoarthritis carried out at the University of Arizona Tucson (published in Nutrition Research) discovered that Pycnogenol was effective for improving pain and joint function. After three months in the Pycnogenol group, there was a reduction of 43 percent in pain, 35 percent in stiffness and 52 percent in physical function subscales, respectively. The placebo group showed no significant scores throughout the entire study.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-ssp090308.php
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