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Old 03-30-2007, 09:20 AM
Mari Mari is offline
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Default Osteoporosis--strontium & magnesium

I have osteoporosis and have been taking strontium for several years based on information such as this from Vitamin Research Products. (Note: there are several paragraphs in this article about strontium and metastatic bone cancer.)
http://tinyurl.com/2qy7ez

However, when I had a hair analysis done, my strontium levels were about twice the normal limits. I have been searching for information about this—are high levels good? Are they toxic? Should I keep taking it or not? I found some answers in an e-alert I received today from the Allergy Research Group.
http://tinyurl.com/2wjdjf

The article concludes that the answer is probably more magnesium (along with the other nutrients needed for bones)—possibly a little strontium. However, my problem there is how to add more magnesium. How can I add more magnesium without making my bowels looser?



Mari
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Old 03-30-2007, 09:43 AM
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Default magnesium

Mari, what form of magnesium are you now taking?

Mike
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Old 03-30-2007, 10:04 AM
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Default strontium

Mari,

I found this from an interesting article about osteoporosis:

"Unlike the range of side-effects that accompany bisphosphonates and other antiresorptive drugs, no side-effects have ever been reported that could be attributed to Strontium. People experienced no symptomatic or chemical or physiological signs of toxicity after taking Strontium supplements for as long as four years, at two and a half times the dose of elemental Strontium that's used in today's clinical trials."

http://www.y2khealthanddetox.com/Osteoporosis.htm

I wish the article had talked about silica. One silica product I have been using is Biosil:

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00371.html

Mike
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Old 03-30-2007, 05:47 PM
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Default magnesium problem ... possible solutions

Mari,

This is an excellent source of information. I've selectively pulled a few recommedations from George's site - check the site out if you'd like to see more, much more, information about magnesium.

http://george-eby-research.com/html/...xiety.html#you

"Use of sacchararomyces boulardii has long been used to treat diarrhea in Europe and is becoming common in the United States. It is drawing attention in HIV/AIDS as a means to stop diarrhea.

Sacchararomyces boulardii is a anti Candida Albicans fungus that will repopulate the intestines and greatly improve digestion and absorption of magnesium. It can support gut function under many adverse conditions, including food allergies, parasites, Crohn's disease, Candida, Salmonella, travelers diarrhea, HIV diarrhea and Pseudomonas.

Clinical studies also demonstrate the protective effect of S. boulardii in intestinal infections, including Clostridium difficile and cholera. The protective effect of S. boulardii involves several types of activity in the epithelial tissue of the digestive tract, including inactivation of bacterial toxins, stimulation of intestinal immune response, and release of polyamines. A common brand is Jarrow.

Perhaps the most significant cause of irritable gut syndrome and diarrhea is consumption of refined sugars, corn syrup, dextrose and all foods with a high glycemic index. Also, see "Glycemic Index of 1200 Foods (how to live to be 100). These soluble carbohydrates should be eliminated from the diet, and consumption of other foods having a high glycemic index greatly reduced.

Use magnesium taurate rather than other forms of oral magnesium.

Try boron supplements (3 to 12 mg/day), which help stimulate mental alertness, taken with magnesium."

BTW, Vitacost sells an affordable magnesium taurate product.

HH
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Old 12-06-2008, 03:02 PM
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Default There's strontium, and there's strontium-90

In an article called "Strontium: Breakthrough Against Osteoporosis" at Strontium: Breakthrough Against Osteoporosis - WorldHealth.net, Ward Dean, MD, the author, says: "Mention strontium to most people, and they will almost always immediately think of strontium-90, a highly dangerous, radioactive component of nuclear fallout produced during atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons in the 1950s. As a result of above-ground nuclear testing, radioactive strontium spread throughout the environment and contaminated dairy products and other foods, and subsequently accumulated in the bones of both children and adults.

"The media made us well aware that strontium-90 could cause our bones to become radioactive, causing cancer or some other horrible disease as a result. So, in the minds of many, strontium is a poison to be avoided, just like other toxic metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium and aluminum.
However, stable strontium -- meaning nonradioactive -- is nontoxic, even when administered in large doses for prolonged periods. It also appears to be one of the most effective substances yet found for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and other bone-related conditions.

"Furthermore, repeatedly administering stable strontium can even gradually eliminate radioactive strontium from the body. The stable form slowly replaces the radioactive form in bone, and radioactive strontium is excreted in the urine.

"Strontium is element number 38 of the periodic table of elements. It was discovered in 1808 and was named after Strontian, a town in Scotland. Strontium is one of the most abundant elements on earth, comprising about 0.04 percent of the earth’s crust. At a concentration of 400 parts per million, there is more strontium in the earth’s crust than carbon.

"Strontium is also the most abundant trace element in seawater, at a concentration of 8.1 parts per million. The human body contains about 320 mg of strontium, nearly all of which is in bone and connective tissue.
Strontium is in row IIa of the periodic table, just below calcium. Like calcium, strontium has two positive charges in its ionic form. Because of its chemical similarity to calcium, strontium can replace calcium to some extent in various biochemical processes in the body, including replacing a small proportion of the calcium in hydroxyapatite crystals of calcified tissues such as bones and teeth. Strontium in these crystals imparts additional strength to these tissues. Strontium also appears to draw extra calcium into bones. When rats or guinea pigs are fed increased amounts of strontium, their bones and teeth became thicker and stronger.

"Strontium has been safely used as a medicinal substance for more than a hundred years. It was first listed in Squire’s Companion to the British Pharma-copoiea in 1884. Subsequently, strontium was used therapeutically in the United States and Europe. As late as 1955, strontium compounds were still listed in the Dispensatory of the United States of America. For decades in the first half of the twentieth century, strontium salts were administered in dosages of 200 to 400 mg/day without toxic effects."

Thus, I wonder what kind of stontium the mineral hair analysis is pointing to. In the above-ciited article, Dr. Dean says that strontium carbonate 680 mg/day (or strontium gluconate 274 mg/day) has shown a 172 percent increase in the rate of bone formation, increasing lumbar bone mineral density by an average of 14.4 percent and femoral neck BMD an average of 8.3 percent. That's impressive.
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Old 12-06-2008, 03:19 PM
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Default Oops!

'Sorry Mari,

I didn't realize that the article you referenced (http://tinyurl.com/2qy7ez) and the one I quoted (Strontium: Breakthrough Against Osteoporosis - WorldHealth.net) are one in the same.

All I know is that after taking strontium for about 6 months, my Live Blood Analysis starting showing thrombocyte aggregation (clotting) that had never appeared in my blood before. I stopped the strontium, and the M.A. in Bio-nutrition, who administers the Live Blood Analysis, said he's never heard of strontium causing such an effect. he suggested that it may have been due to the sugar in the fruit I was eating at the time. (((Huh???))

So I've started up on the strontium again because I too have osteoporosis, and I'm scared to death of my bones disintegrating.

Other than the loose bowels, is the strontium/magnesium working for you? If you've been taking it for several years, and if the information in the articles we're talking about is true (that strontium increases lumbar BMD by an average of 14.4 % and femoral neck BMD an average of 8.3 %), you ought to be well on your way to strong heathy bones again by now, no? Is that you experience?
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Old 12-06-2008, 04:38 PM
Mari Mari is offline
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Since I really did not know what to do, I decreased my dosage to 340mg a day and take it with breakfast rather than on an empty stomach. I have just sent in a urine sample for the DPD CrossLink Test to measure the rate of bone loss. I will not have the results for a few more days.

Here are some excerpts from the article by Alan R. Gaby

Strontium for osteoporosis: to dose or to megadose? | Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients | Find Articles at BNET

Studies published over the past several years have shown that supplementation with pharmacological doses of strontium (as strontium ranelate) can increase bone mineral density (BMD) and reduce fracture risk in postmenopausal women. The amount of strontium used in the largest of these studies was 680 mg per day, which is roughly 200 to 600 times the amount found in a typical diet (1 to 3 mg per day). Based on this research, high-dose strontium therapy has become popular among practitioners of natural medicine as a treatment for osteoporosis.

While no serious side effects were reported in studies lasting up to three years, questions remain about the long-term safety of high-dose strontium. It is also not clear whether pharmacological doses are necessary to prevent and treat osteoporosis successfully. According to one study, 170 mg of strontium per day was more effective than 680 mg per day for reducing fracture risk, which raises the possibility that even lower doses might be as effective as, or more effective than, the doses that have been studied.

In the largest published clinical trial, 1,649 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis received 680 mg per day of strontium or placebo for three years. (1) The mean BMD of the lumbar spine increased progressively in the strontium group and was 8.1% higher than that in the placebo group after three years (p < 0.001). Compared with placebo, strontium reduced the incidence of vertebral fractures by 49% after one year and by 41% at three years.

In the three-year clinical trial mentioned previously, 20 participants who had received 680 mg per day of strontium for three years consented to a bone biopsy. No evidence of osteomalacia or a mineralization defect was found. However, the investigators biopsied only mature (lamellar) bone, whereas the earliest evidence of a mineralization defect would likely be observed in newly formed bone. Of note, the extent to which strontium prevented fractures decreased as the study progressed (49% reduction after one year, 41% reduction after three years), even though BMD increased linearly with each year of strontium supplementation. One would have expected that protection against fractures would have more closely paralleled changes in BMD. While it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions from these data, they are consistent with the possibility that new bone formed under the influence of high-dose strontium therapy is not of high quality.

Investigators have focused on relatively high strontium doses, because they are the most effective at increasing BMD. However, in a two-year study of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, the incidence of new vertebral fractures was lower in the group receiving 170 mg per day of strontium than in those receiving 680 mg per day (38.8% vs. 42.0%), even though BMD increased with increasing strontium doses. (9) There have been no studies in humans using less than 170 mg per day.
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Old 12-06-2008, 04:39 PM
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Very interesting article from the Anti Aging Congress, Lady Hawk. I had been taking strontium but cut way back due to uncertainty and mixed reviews. I don't have osteoporosis but endeavor to prevent it. I may start increasing my dosage again and its effects on cartilage is an added plus!.. Since most people who get fractures to the vertebra also have deformed and degenerated cartilage in the same area.
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Old 12-06-2008, 04:45 PM
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Mari, from the article you posted comes the following quote -
" According to one study, 170 mg of strontium per day was more effective than 680 mg per day for reducing fracture risk, which raises the possibility that even lower doses might be as effective as, or more effective than, the doses that have been studied."

I had cut down my strontium use to 340mg one time a week. So perhaps I have gained some positive effect.., considering that I don't have osteoporosis but wish to just maintain consistent bone replacement. Now since I have reached menopause perhaps I should increase the dosage
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Old 12-06-2008, 07:26 PM
Mari Mari is offline
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Arrow, I think that one statement more than any other was the reason I reduced my dosage.

Mari
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