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Old 11-04-2009, 05:29 AM
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Default vitamin D and Mortality

More evidence for the protection of Vitamin D for the elderly in a new study.

http://www.nutraingredients.com/cont...w/print/266497

Quote:
Low vitamin D again linked to higher mortality

By Stephen Daniells, 03-Nov-2009


Low blood levels of vitamin D have again been linked to lower survival in the elderly – a study which strengthens calls to confirm if vitamin D supplements could offer protection.


Writing in the journal Clinical Endocrinology, scientists from the Netherlands, Austria, and the US report that low blood levels of the sunshine vitamin are associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, and mortality from heart disease.
“Our results provide a rationale for future studies to test whether vitamin D supplementation reduces mortality and/or cardiovascular diseases in persons with vitamin D deficiency,” wrote the researchers, led by Stefan Pilz from the Medical University of Graz in Austria
“These studies are urgently needed to answer the question whether vitamin D deficiency is a cause or a consequence of a poor health status,” they added.



Snowballing science

The research follows hot on the heels of similar findings published in Nutrition Research by scientists led by Richard Semba from the Johns Hopkins University. The researchers looked at vitamin D levels in the form of 25- hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), , in 714 community-dwelling women, aged between 70 and 79 years, participating in the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II.

Semba and his co-workers noted that several biologic mechanisms could explain a causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and mortality, with the vitamin’s active form (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) linked to a range of effects including control of inflammatory compounds, regulating immune health and blood pressure, or reducing arterial hardening.

Prior to this, a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine grabbed headlines around the world when it reported that . This earlier study used data from 13,331 men and women participating in the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES III).

New data

The new study used data from 614 people participating in the Hoorn Study, a prospective population-based study with men and women with an average age of 69.8. Blood levels of 25(OH)D were measured at the start of the study.

After an average of six years of follow-up, 51 deaths had been documented, 20 of which were due to cardiovascular health.
People with the lowest average vitamin D levels (30.6 nanomoles per litre) were found to be at a 124 and 378 per cent increased risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality, respectively.

Commenting on the potential mechanism, the researchers note: “Apart from the maintenance of muscular and skeletal health, vitamin D may also protect against cancer, infections, autoimmune and vascular diseases, suggesting that vitamin D deficiency might contribute to a reduced life expectancy.”

D details

Vitamin D refers to two biologically inactive precursors - D3, also known as cholecalciferol, and D2, also known as ergocalciferol. The former, produced in the skin on exposure to UVB radiation (290 to 320 nm), is said to be more bioactive.
While our bodies do manufacture vitamin D on exposure to sunshine, the levels in some northern countries are so weak during the winter months that our body makes no vitamin D at all, meaning that dietary supplements and fortified foods are seen by many as the best way to boost intakes of vitamin D.

In adults, it is said vitamin D deficiency may precipitate or exacerbate osteopenia, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, fractures, common cancers, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases and cardiovascular diseases. There is also some evidence that the vitamin may reduce the incidence of several types of cancer and type-1 diabetes.

Source: Clinical Endocrinology
November 2009, Volume 71, Issue 5, Pages: 666-672
“Vitamin D and mortality in older men and women”
Authors: S. Pilz, H. Dobnig, G. Nijpels, R.J. Heine, C.D.A. Stehouwer, M.B. Snijder, R.M. van Dam, J.M. Dekker
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Old 11-04-2009, 03:40 PM
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DISEASE INCIDENCE BY 25(OH)D
But it's not just the risk of death that matters.
Avoiding chronic illness by keeping 25(OH)D above 137.5nmol/l 55ng/ml is also a good idea.
Remember our innate immune function is regulated by the availability of vitamin D3. If you want to beat the bugs you have to have a reserve of D3.
Your body only stores D3 AFTER you daily needs have been met.
You can only save money after you've earn't more money daily than you spend daily.
So below 4000iu/daily intake no stored D3 you are more or less living hand to mouth with your insufficient vitamin d3 economy.


Get your level above 50ng 125nmol.l and you see the stored D3 levels increasebut to get to that level you need at least 5000iu/daily/D3. $15= £10 for a years supply and you can save the postage with code WAB666.
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:59 AM
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Default Vitamin D3 in isolation?

Is not vitamin A reqquired as a companion to vitamin D?

A while back I started taking 5000 IUs of daily thinking
that I was getting enough A in my normal diet. Everything
was fine for a month or so then my immune response
became clearly deficient. It took several days of A at
a level of 10:1 A to D to remedy the situation.

While it is possible to get plenty of A in the diet, it doesn't
automatically happen unless you eat lots of liver.

Thoughts?
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Old 11-07-2009, 03:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donee View Post
Is not vitamin A reqquired as a companion to vitamin D?

A while back I started taking 5000 IUs of daily thinking
that I was getting enough A in my normal diet. Everything
was fine for a month or so then my immune response
became clearly deficient. It took several days of A at
a level of 10:1 A to D to remedy the situation.

While it is possible to get plenty of A in the diet, it doesn't
automatically happen unless you eat lots of liver.

Thoughts?
Dr Cannell who has considered Vitamin A toxicity and the relevance to Vitamin D3 has recently supported the introduction of his idea of the optimum vitamin d plus combination. You can see the details here. I haven't used them myself but I did start using a single Codliver oil capsule and I invested in some boron but I was already taking magnesium, vitamin K2 and Zinc.

It's pretty obvious that a naked body in the sun naturally acquires 10,000~20,000iu of vitamin d in a relatively short time. Heaney has worked out that on average human bodies use around 5000iu/daily/D3.
I have seen no evidence supporting the use of ten times these amounts of vitamin A and I doubt we would have evolved to.
You may want to read about Vitamin A toxicity
but also read the stuff at Weston Price about vitamin A.

I think there may be a difference between synthetic and natural vitamin A.

I am suspicious of Cod Liver oil capsules that provide one fixed amount for the vit A / vitamin d content as we know these vary seasonally and a fixed amount can only be achieved industrially and doesn't occur naturally.
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