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Old 09-25-2011, 03:53 AM
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Default On the evils of wheat




On the evils of wheat
Dr. William Davis on why it is so addictive, and how shunning it will make you skinny
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Old 09-25-2011, 04:54 AM
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As a general rule, if you trying to drop some weight, you cannot have pasta. For whatever reason it is the biggest hinderence of weight loss.
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Old 09-25-2011, 08:56 AM
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This is such an informative article. Of course it fully supports the low carb Atkins type of diet.

But it also makes clear that hybridization of plants can be as dangerous as GMO, creating foreign protiens and god only knows what else in these plants.

Where does one go to get heirloom flour?
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Old 09-25-2011, 09:05 AM
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So here you have it at Anson Mills.... they sell heirloom wheat and corn products.. they average 4 to 10 dollars a pound...

http://www.ansonmills.com/
or:
http://s55352.storefront-solutions.c...eyWords=turkey

I can either die from eathing regular wheat or die trying to pay for this.

here's another article on Heirloom wheat. Seems some varieties produce quite well and are competitive with hybrid wheat.
http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/01/i...jim-lahey.html
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Old 09-25-2011, 09:31 AM
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[PDF]
Phytic Acid in Cereal Grains: Structure, Healthy or Harmful Ways
If you are going back to heirloom varieties you may also want to consider traditional ways of dealing with grain to reduce the problems with phytates.
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Old 09-25-2011, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted_Hutchinson View Post
[PDF]
Phytic Acid in Cereal Grains: Structure, Healthy or Harmful Ways
If you are going back to heirloom varieties you may also want to consider traditional ways of dealing with grain to reduce the problems with phytates.
That article is difficult to read quickly. I'll have to take more time. I see not a problem with IP6, not at all. Phytic acid is going to be saturated with the minerals of the plant. For it to bind to a mineral in the body, it must give up some. It has a higher affinity with the heavier metals. That's a good thing. IP6 is one of the best chelators of iron.
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Old 09-25-2011, 10:28 AM
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I've never looked at oat bread, but does anyone think this would be the way to go? I currently eat Ezekiel 4:9.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:05 PM
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Wheat Belly Blues - James Winningham

Wheat Belly Blues by James Winningham
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:27 PM
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Does organic wheat make a difference?
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:17 PM
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I'm not sure. I don't eat anything with wheat in it except occasionally I'll cheat. I think that non-organic wheat actually contains more minerals than do organic but the problem comes from the changes in varieties and gliadin content rather than the fertilizer/pesticide regimes. However I think I've read that the more pescticide use creates more allergic potential, but organic farmers may prefer varieties that are naturally more pest resistant and these will also be more allergenic than the varieties the pest prefer so I don't think you can win either way.

For a more informed view of Wheat Belly here's Chris Masterjohn's take on the issue.
Wheat Belly -- The Toll of Hubris on Human Health
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Old 11-04-2011, 11:05 PM
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Thanks for the links, Arrowwind. Will pass the word...
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saved1986 View Post
Does organic wheat make a difference?

Organic does not regulate hybridization and this article suggests that the problems with wheat have come out of hybridization, not GMO... although GMO certainly could do it also. So organic hybrid wheat, which most organic is, can cause problems.

You would have to use Heirloom variety of seed and that is why I posted the link in post #4
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:15 AM
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Hybridization of wheat began in the early 20th century. More and quality wheat was needed for a growing global population. The quality problem was due to climate and pests. I thought that hybridization was required so that the wheat would not revert back to its primitive grass form. Apparently not. Now, the competition for more and quality wheat is being managed by genetic modification. Apparently hybridization stopped working so well.
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:39 AM
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Doubled haploid technology brings promise to wheat breeders
By Jennifer M. Latzke


There is a good description of modern wheat breading techniques here.
I think the thing you can be certain of is that the varieties of wheat produced are substantially different from anything humans have tolerated or we evolved to tolerate. While we cannot assume these will cause problems we should not assume that they are safe for human consumption.
These forms would not have arrived by natural selection so it seems to me to wrong to assume they are safe until proven otherwise.
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:44 AM
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There are many companies which specialize in heritage seeds. Native Seeds is one company which sells heritage wheat seeds. I bought some of their winter wheat and planted it. Unfortunately my newest pup ate all of the sprouts.
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genetic modification, heirloom wheat, hybrid wheat, obesity, wheat, wheat belly, william davis
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