Go Back   Natural Medicine Talk > Health > Mental Health

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 01-10-2012, 03:04 PM
Ted_Hutchinson's Avatar
Ted_Hutchinson Ted_Hutchinson is offline
Lecturer
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,986
Blog Entries: 5
Ted_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the rough
Default

The effect of acetyl-L-Carnitine and Lipoic acid treatment in ApoE4 mouse as a model of human Alzheimer’s disease This is a study where they looked at combining CARNITINE with LIPOIC ACID.

Acetyl-L-carnitine ameliorates spatial memory deficits induced by inhibition of phosphoinositol-3 kinase and protein kinase C. this explains the mechanism by which carnitine may be effective
500 mg, twice daily is a standard amount.


example
Country Life, Gluten Free, L-Carnitine Caps, 500 mg, 60 Veggie Caps $18.87

Lipoic acid: energy metabolism and redox regulation of transcription and cell signaling This paper is explaining how Lipoic acid helps with the mitochondrial dsyfunction that underlies part of the disease process in diabetes (and Alzheimer's) The biologically active `R` form is probably the most reliable form of this antioxidant to effectively help metabolic disease.
Here is an example for price comparison
Doctor's Best, Best Stabilized R-Lipoic Acid, 100 mg, 60 Veggie Caps IHERB $17.60
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-10-2012, 03:23 PM
Ted_Hutchinson's Avatar
Ted_Hutchinson Ted_Hutchinson is offline
Lecturer
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,986
Blog Entries: 5
Ted_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the rough
Default

I've talked about the importance of correcting vitamin/hormone deficiencies that naturally occur with ageing Vitamin D3 and Melatonin will ALWAYS be lower in older people and SHOULD automatically be corrected in EVERYONE over 60yrs old irrespective of whether or not they've a Dementia diagnosis. Now we know Mild Cognitive impairment precedes Alzheimer's and is strongly associated with low vitamin D status then the time to correct low vit d levels is BEFORE the cognitive impairment sets it. Everyone reading this can afford the £10 total annual cost so why risk dementia to save a few pence?

However I haven't yet mentioned MAGNESIUM
Altered ionized magnesium levels in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.
Quote:
Abstract
Magnesium deficiency is present in several chronic, age-related diseases, including cardiovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases.
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia.
The aim of the present study was to study magnesium homeostasis in patients with mild to moderate AD.
One hundred and one elderly (≥65 years) patients were consecutively recruited (mean age: 73.4±0.8 years; M/F: 42/59).
In all patients, a comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed including cognitive and functional status.
Admission criteria for the AD group (diagnosed according to the DSM-IV and the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) included: mild to moderate cognitive impairment (MMSE score: 11-24/30, corrected for age and education).
Blood samples were analyzed for serum total magnesium (Mg-tot) and serum ionized magnesium (Mg-ion).
AD patients had significantly lower MMSE scores (20.5±0.7 vs 27.9±0.2; p<0.001), and for the physical function tests.
Mg-ion was significantly lower in the AD group as compared to age-matched control adults without AD (0.50±0.01 mmol/L vs 0.53±0.01 mmol/L; p<0.01).
No significant differences were found in Mg-tot between the two groups (1.91±0.03 mEq/L vs 1.95±0.03 mEq/L; p=NS).
For all subjects, Mg-ion levels were significantly and directly related only to cognitive function (Mg-ion/MMSE r=0.24 p<0.05), while no significant correlations were found in this group of patients between magnesium and ADL or IADL.
Our results show the presence of subclinical alterations in Mg-ion in patients with mild to moderate AD.
It's always a good idea to supplement with magnesium when you correct vitamin D deficiency because doing that increases your ability to absorb calcium from the diet/water and calcium requires magnesium to counterbalance it's actions. There is usually sufficient calcium in the diet (yoghurt/milk/cheese fish veggies) but modern foods often lack magnesium and MOST adults only get about half the recommended daily amount so we are mostly magnesium deficient. Magnesium is closely associated with depression levels and depression is often a cofactor in Alzheimer's progression so it's one to avoid.

Example product Doctor's Best, High Absorption Magnesium, 240 Tablets
Our price: $17.17 Amino acid chelate supplied by Albion Advanced Nutrition. these are the most reliably absorbed.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-10-2012, 03:40 PM
Ted_Hutchinson's Avatar
Ted_Hutchinson Ted_Hutchinson is offline
Lecturer
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,986
Blog Entries: 5
Ted_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the rough
Default

Lithium 'slows development of Alzheimer's'
Quote:
A trial of 41 people over 60 years of age with mild cognitive impairment, a condition that often leads to full-blown Alzheimer's, found that the rate of mental decline was lower in the half given 150mg of lithium daily, compared to those given a placebo.
While all participants showed a decline in memory function and attention tasks over the year, the rate of decline among those on lithium was significantly less. Levels of a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease called phospho-tau concentrations also rose more slowly in those on lithium.
Psychiatrists believe this is because it "may hamper mechanisms that lead to the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles", microscopic brain structures linked to the most common form of dementia.
Dr Orestes Forlenza, who led the research, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, said: "This study supports the idea that giving lithium to a person who is at risk of Alzheimer’s disease may have a protective effect, and slow down the progression of memory loss to dementia."
Professor Allan Young, a psychiatrist from Imperial College London, described the study as "encouraging" - and particularly interesting because no pharmaceutical company has a patent on lithium, meaning it is very cheap to prescribe.
He added: "This trial adds to the increasing evidence that lithium may have beneficial effects on the brain and begs to be replicated in further randomised trials."
But Rebecca Wood, chief executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK, said it was "too soon to draw any firm conclusions" because of the small study size.
Dr Anne Corbett, research manager at the Alzheimer's Society, said: "We need more, larger clinical trials to test existing drugs like lithium if we are to find better treatments for people with Alzheimer’s.
"Yet such trials are very expensive. We need greater investment in this area in order to help us develop better treatments for people with this devastating condition."
In the above study they used 150mg of lithium daily,
Example Doctor's Best, Best Lithium Orotate, 200 Tablets Our price: $11.98
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-10-2012, 06:48 PM
kind2creatures's Avatar
kind2creatures kind2creatures is offline
...elusive dreamer
Wiki Editor
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 6,566
Blog Entries: 24
kind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to behold
Default

Here's something I just posted about nicotine patches possibly helping those with Alzheimer's Disease...http://www.natmedtalk.com/showthread...906#post193906
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-10-2012, 08:52 PM
saved1986's Avatar
saved1986 saved1986 is offline
In seaerch of spicy food
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 4,069
saved1986 has a spectacular aura aboutsaved1986 has a spectacular aura aboutsaved1986 has a spectacular aura about
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kind2creatures View Post
Here's something I just posted about nicotine patches possibly helping those with Alzheimer's Disease...http://www.natmedtalk.com/showthread...906#post193906

WHOA They say somoking helps prevent alzheimers. (NO, I am not looking for excuses to smoke. I would rather die of alzheimers than lung cancer. At least I can hide my own easter eggs)
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-11-2012, 08:12 AM
Arrowwind09's Avatar
Arrowwind09 Arrowwind09 is offline
Standing at the Portal
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,537
Arrowwind09 has a spectacular aura aboutArrowwind09 has a spectacular aura about
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted_Hutchinson View Post
ISure But incorporate (coconut oil) it in foods or drinks so it is a part of the meal rather than as a supplement.
I have found this just about impossible to do. When its time to eat a meal I simply take a large spoonful of coconut oil first, sometimes right after (somewhere between 1 and 2 teaspoons for me) then sit down to eat.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-11-2012, 09:54 AM
jfh jfh is offline
perpetual student
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 5,226
jfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to beholdjfh is a splendid one to behold
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by saved1986 View Post
WHOA They say somoking helps prevent alzheimers. (NO, I am not looking for excuses to smoke. I would rather die of alzheimers than lung cancer. At least I can hide my own easter eggs)
No they are not saying anything about smoking. So no excuses for you.
__________________
.
- Jim

"The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched — they must be felt with the heart." — Helen Keller
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-11-2012, 02:05 PM
liverock's Avatar
liverock liverock is offline
Lecturer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Out of sight
Posts: 1,535
Blog Entries: 1
liverock is a glorious beacon of lightliverock is a glorious beacon of lightliverock is a glorious beacon of lightliverock is a glorious beacon of lightliverock is a glorious beacon of light
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted_Hutchinson View Post
Lithium 'slows development of Alzheimer's'
In the above study they used 150mg of lithium daily,
Example Doctor's Best, Best Lithium Orotate, 200 Tablets Our price: $11.98
Texas is the state with the highest lithium levels in the drinking water(El Paso has the highest). It appears to cut down on crime levels as well as AD.

http://www.newswithviews.com/Howenstine/james11.htm
Quote:
Ten years of research by 27 counties in Texas disclosed that the incidence of homicide, rape, robbery, burglary, arrests for drug possession, and suicide[4] were higher in counties whose drinking water contained little or no lithium. Counties whose drinking water naturally contained higher amounts of lithium had significantly lower rates of all these crimes. These counties with higher levels of lithium in their tap water experienced fewer hospitalizations for homicides, mental illness[5], psychosis, neurosis, schizophrenia, and personality disorder
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-11-2012, 07:00 PM
kind2creatures's Avatar
kind2creatures kind2creatures is offline
...elusive dreamer
Wiki Editor
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 6,566
Blog Entries: 24
kind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to beholdkind2creatures is a splendid one to behold
Default

Was watching the Dr. Oz show today, and he mentioned that a vitamin B12 deficiency can actually mimic Alzheimer's. They were saying that some signs of vitamin B12 deficiency was poor memory and confusion. Since it's not very readily absorbed in the elderly, they recommended vit B12 shots, after blood tests confirmed a deficiency. But...they also said that supplementing was very safe and overdose was very unlikely.

I'm taking a sublingual vitamin B12 lozenge daily (Solaray), 2,000mcg, along with a B-50 complex. Something that certainly wouldn't hurt in your mom's situation at all, and might very well help her. More info on B12...http://www.natmedtalk.com/wiki/Vitamin_B12
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-12-2012, 12:58 AM
Ted_Hutchinson's Avatar
Ted_Hutchinson Ted_Hutchinson is offline
Lecturer
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,986
Blog Entries: 5
Ted_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the roughTed_Hutchinson is a jewel in the rough
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kind2creatures View Post
Was watching the Dr. Oz show today, and he mentioned that a vitamin B12 deficiency can actually mimic Alzheimer's. They were saying that some signs of vitamin B12 deficiency was poor memory and confusion. Since it's not very readily absorbed in the elderly, they recommended vit B12 shots, after blood tests confirmed a deficiency. But...they also said that supplementing was very safe and overdose was very unlikely.

I'm taking a sublingual vitamin B12 lozenge daily (Solaray), 2,000mcg, along with a B-50 complex. Something that certainly wouldn't hurt in your mom's situation at all, and might very well help her. More info on B12...http://www.natmedtalk.com/wiki/Vitamin_B12
The active form used in the brain is Methylcobalamin as this form is readily available and known to be the effective form I don't understand(apart from the fact it's cheaper) why the less active Cyanocobalamin form is used.
While Dr Oz may promote the use of shots the evidence remains that oral sprays/sublingual methylcobalamin are cheaper, more effective and the preferred route.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21556950Oral vitamin B12 replacement is an effective and safe treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency in gastric cancer patients after total gastrectomy.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 01-12-2012, 10:36 AM
Arrowwind09's Avatar
Arrowwind09 Arrowwind09 is offline
Standing at the Portal
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,537
Arrowwind09 has a spectacular aura aboutArrowwind09 has a spectacular aura about
Default

I have done the oral application of B12 and the shots. I find the shots in maga dosages far superior if you are really trying to change a symptomatic problem involving nerves or nerve damage a.nd of coures this would include alzheimers. These treatments go beyond treating deficiency.

start by reading this book by Sally Pacholock RN BSN and Jeffery Steuat DO:
http://www.amazon.com/Could-Be-B12-E...6389312&sr=1-1

Presenting a wide scope of problems caused by B12 deficiency, this comprehensive guide provides up-to-date medical information about symptoms, testing, diagnosis, and treatment. Written for both the patient and the interested layperson, this detailed book outlines how physicians frequently misdiagnose B12 deficiency as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, mental retardation, Parkinson’s disease, depression, or other mental illnesses. Now in the second edition, this resource has been thoroughly updated with the latest research, diagnostic tests, treatment options, case studies, and testimonials.




Show More

Show Less

Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
alpha lipoic acid, alzheimer's disease, coconut oil, dementia, evco, huperzine a, mct, turmeric
Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Suggestions for alternative treatment...please! 'Niiter n' me Cancer 48 12-05-2011 06:28 PM
Alternative Cancer Treatment Center in Denver rdwhitaker Alternative Therapies 4 10-10-2011 09:06 PM
High cost of alternative treatment astonishann Cancer 10 07-13-2011 11:33 PM
Alternative Treatment Website kind2creatures Cancer 2 09-26-2010 07:41 AM
Superbugs - alternative treatment Marcus General Discussions 3 07-09-2006 03:34 PM